Diabetes

15.06.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

WHAT IS DIABETES? 

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that occurs when the body is unable to properly regulate the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood. Poor control of diabetes can lead to high blood sugar levels and cause long term damage to your overall health and organs. 

WHAT HEALTH PROBLEMS DOES IT CAUSE? 

High blood sugar levels can cause a lot of damage to your body and if not managed correctly, may lead to many diabetic complications. This will cause long term health problems, especially if they go untreated. 

HOW DOES DIABETES AFFECT OTHER PARTS OF YOUR BODY?

Eyes: Retinopathy is a complication of diabetes caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the retina, often leading to vision impairment. It is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in the UK. As a consequence of diabetic retinopathy, swelling can take place, called diabetic macular oedema. People with diabetes are also more prone to develop cataracts and glaucoma at an earlier age, contributing to vision reduction.

Feet: Foot health is often a neglected area anyway but high blood glucose levels can lead to insensitivity in the foot and lower limbs, which means you lose the ability to feel pain and distinguish hot or cold.  It can also lead to less blood supply to your feet leading to poor circulation. 

Loss of sensitivity means that you may not notice if you have a minor cut, sore or wound and poor circulation means if you do get a cut or sore, it will take longer to heal and open wounds are more likely to become infected. This combination is why there is an increase in risk of amputation for those who are diabetic. Regular podiatry appointments are the best way to look after your foot health.

Heart: High blood sugar levels can also cause problems to your blood vessels which can sometimes lead to serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Kidneys: High blood sugar levels creates more difficulty for the kidneys to clear waste. This may lead to Diabetic Nephropathy, the deterioration of the kidneys.

HOW CAN DIABETES BE TREATED? 

There is currently no cure for diabetes, therefore, the best way to deal with diabetes is to get it properly managed and controlled. If you are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you must either inject or pump insulin into body to treat your diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may also have to use insulin, however, it can be managed through diet and lifestyle changes. 

HOW CAN YOU TEST FOR DIABETES?

An instant HbA1c test can confirm if you’re within the recommended range, or are considered pre-diabetic or confirm that you have diabetes. Using a small blood sample it will measure how well your blood sugar has been controlled over the last 3 months and provide a numerical reading.

As the HbA1c test provides 3-months insight, it is an important blood test for diagnosed diabetics. It provides a good indication of how well they are managing their diabetes.. 

Many people are more familiar with the glucose blood test – it measures the concentration of glucose molecules in your blood at a single point in time. The amount of glucose in your blood could also indicate whether you could be diabetic or not. People with diabetes can also use this test to manage their condition on a daily basis alongside regular HbA1C testing.

You can book an instant HbA1C test online at a cost of £54.50.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

When it comes to diabetes the symptoms are not always obvious and can often go unnoticed for long periods of time before being diagnosed. 

The most common symptoms include:

  • Feeling constantly thirsty or dehydrated 
  • Unintentional loss of weight and increased appetite (type 1)
  • Vision begins to blur
  • Numbness in your hands or feet (type 2)
  • Fatigue 
  • Urinating more frequently 

WHO IS AT RISK?

In the UK, type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, affecting over 90% of sufferers. The symptoms of diabetes are often mild, therefore, it’s important to be aware of the risk factors that could make you more susceptible to diabetes in the future. 

According to Diabetes UK, type 2 diabetes is twice more likely in people of African descent in comparison to people of European descent and six times more likely in South Asian communities, making them a high risk category in developing diabetes. Additionally, people of African – Caribbean and South Asian descent are also at risk of type 2 diabetes much earlier, usually over the age of 25. On the other hand, for Europeans the risk increases when over the age of 40. Other factors contributing to diabetes include being overweight, high blood pressure and genetics. 

Other general risk factors include:

  • Having high blood pressure
  • Carrying extra weight around your middle
  • Smoking 
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) sufferers
  • Those with a sedentary lifestyle
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Those with disturbed sleep – this includes those who do not get enough sleep and those whose sleep too much

 

If you have symptoms of diabetes or general concerns about your diabetic risk, you can book a GP appointment to discuss in more detail. 

Alternatively, you can book in for an instant HbA1c test with a nurse

 

Monkeypox Statement

30.05.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

With monkeypox cases being recorded in over 20 countries across the globe, people are becoming increasingly concerned about its spread and transmission.

Following 2 years of the Covid-19 pandemic, this outbreak has reignited the public’s fear and uncertainty of infectious diseases. 

Whilst the media coverage of the monkeypox outbreak is alarming, we would like to reassure our patients that as it stands, the risk is still very minimal and vaccination is not advised as a precautionary measure. Whilst vaccines will undoubtedly be a key part of containing the outbreak, for now, only people who may have been exposed are being offered vaccination.

Our Medical Director & Travel Medicine Specialist, Dr Richard Dawood explains;

“Lots of people have been getting in touch with us to ask about a monkeypox vaccination, but this is not available privately. It is currently only being offered to anyone identified as a direct, close contact of a confirmed case deemed to be at sufficient risk.

The current outbreak does, however, highlight the need to think about your vaccine protection more generally, whether for travel or simply to protect your health and well-being, taking advantage of the best vaccines currently available.”

In a more general sense, it is never too late to catch up on childhood vaccinations, incomplete vaccination courses or any required boosters.

Your immune system naturally decreases with age and certain diseases are also more prevalent in older adults so there may be new vaccinations which are now suitable for you to consider for preventable diseases. Some health conditions can also weaken the body’s immune response, making you more vulnerable to infectious diseases, complications and hospitalisation. Therefore, it is important to ask your GP which vaccinations would be suitable for keeping you healthy.
 – For more information on wellness vaccinations.

If you are travelling soon and haven’t had a travel consultation with a travel nurse, perhaps it is time to consider one. Travel nurses are experts in travel health and will advise which travel vaccinations & medications you should consider based on the risk of where you are travelling to and your itinerary once there.
– For m
ore information on travel consultations.

To conclude, we’d like to dismiss a couple of dangerous myths about monkeypox that are unnecessarily scaremongering the public:

Myth 1: Monkeypox is as contagious as COVID-19 or smallpox

Fact: Monkeypox is far less contagious compared to smallpox, measles, or COVID-19.

Myth 2: Monkeypox is a new virus.

Fact: No, the monkeypox virus is not a novel virus. It’s a known virus and is generally seen in central and western African countries as localised outbreaks.

In summary, we, like the rest of the medical field, will be keeping a close eye on the progression of the Monkeypox outbreak and should our advice change based on new information, we will update this statement accordingly.

 

For more information on Monkeypox.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) & Diet

08.03.2022 Category: Dietitian Author: Ruth Kander

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a long-term condition where the kidneys don’t work as well as they should. In some circumstances, the loss of kidney function can get progressively worse over time but CKD only reaches an advanced stage in a small proportion of people. Although the damage is irreparable, sometimes if changes are made, CKD can be halted with no further damage occurring.

Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is divided into 5 stages.
Stage 1 is the earliest stage whereby tests have indicated some level of kidney damage. It is important not to ignore a stage 1 diagnosis as this is the time to take action and make lifestyle changes so that the condition does not worsen. With every increase in stage, more kidney damage has been detected up until the last stage, stage 5. Stage 5 means the kidneys have lost almost all their function and it will be time for thinking about dialysis or a transplant.

What to do if your recent blood test shows a reduced kidney function.
Don’t panic, absorb the diagnosis and understand this doesn’t definitively mean your kidneys will stop working altogether. CKD should not be ignored as it can get worse over time but with careful monitoring and management it can be maintained and you can live long fulfilling lives without being unduly affected by the condition.

It is important to review your lifestyle and in particular, your diet. With early stage CKD (stages 1-3) it is paramount to be as healthy as possible and have a healthy balanced diet.

What do  I mean by a healthy balanced diet?

This includes: 

  1. Consistently eating freshly cooked food for every meal
  2. Limiting your intake of processed foods and avoid highly-processed foods
  3. Reducing your daily salt intake
  4. Having considered balanced meals – your lunch and dinner meals should contain proteins, carbohydrates and vegetables. Your portion size will depend on your  weight and if you have diabetes
  5. Ensuring you have a minimum of 2-3 portions of fruits and vegetables each and every day
  6. Increasing your intake of plant based proteins such as beans, lentils, tofu, soya, seitan 
  7. Drinking lots of water to remain well hydrated (ensure your urine runs clear)
  8. Being as active as physically possible for you
  9. Avoiding non-steroidal medicines such as ibuprofen, naproxen etc.

What is a renal diet?
You may have heard of the term, renal diet. The term is used quite widely amongst those who have CKD, but personally, I am not a fan of this term. It doesn’t really mean much and can often be misused. People often think it means a diet of low protein, low salt, low potassium and low phosphate – which is pretty hard to do all at once and not always necessary. 

People newly diagnosed with CKD in particular often restrict their diet in a panic unnecessarily and in combination with online resources not being clear enough, this can cause a lot of confusion.

My advice would be to seek guidance from someone like myself, a dietician who can look at your lifestyle and individual health and work out a personalised diet plan. This will be much more achievable and as well as not feeling so overwhelming, you’ll only have to limit the foods you absolutely need to.

How do you monitor CKD?
The best way to monitor CKD is to have regular tests, either blood or urine. How often you require testing will be dictated by the stage of CKD. Your GP will determine what is best for you and it is best to ask them any medical and testing questions rather than your dietician who will focus solely on your lifestyle and diet.

______________

Ruth Kander is a kidney-specialist dietitian, to book an appointment with her please click here.

Taking Women's Health Seriously

07.03.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Women today lead incredibly busy lives. They run and organise homes and build successful careers, usually all whilst taking on the majority share of caring for their children and often their older relatives. It is therefore not uncommon for women to have little or no time to look after themselves, their health included.

In addition to not making time to prioritise their health, it seems that when women do put their health first and seek medical advice, they are less likely to feel heard and supported in comparison to their male counterparts.

A recent survey by The Department of Health and Social Care found that “more than 4 in 5 (84%) women they surveyed had experienced times when they (or the woman they had in mind) were not listened to by healthcare professionals.”

Based on the data they collected, ‘not being listened to’ appears to be present at all stages of the healthcare pathway. Specifically, many women told them: 

  • their symptoms were not taken seriously and/or dismissed upon first contact with GPs and other health professionals 
  • they had to persistently advocate for themselves to secure a diagnosis, often over multiple visits, months and years 
  • if they did secure a diagnosis, there were limited opportunities to discuss or ask questions about treatment options and their preferences were often ignored

Many women recalled their symptoms being dismissed upon first contact with GPs and other professionals; women felt they had to persistently advocate for themselves to secure a diagnosis, often over multiple visits, months and years; and post-diagnosis, discussions about treatment options were often limited, and some said their preferences were ignored. 

To make matters worse, there is some evidence that due to historical clinical trials being disproportionately male-orientated there is much less research into women-only health concerns and assumptions have been made that similar medical treatments will work for both sexes. The top reasons for the under-representation of women in trials were the belief that hormone fluctuations could influence results and concerns that fertility could be affected. A widely accepted negative repercussion, amongst others, being that women are much more likely to experience adverse side effects of medications because drug dosages have historically been based on clinical trials conducted on men.

A combination of these factors may explain why there is a gender gap in health outcomes, with women experiencing poorer health outcomes in comparison to men. We strongly believe in equality and ensuring health is a top priority for all.

Therefore, here are the top health symptoms women should never ignore:

1) Any change in bowel habit and/ or urination

This includes blood in the stools, unexplained persistent abdominal pain, weight loss, lumps around the anus, lack of appetite, blood in the urine or increased frequency of urination. These are all reasons for seeing your doctor ASAP as these symptoms could be due to bowel, bladder or ovarian cancer. All patients should have an annual faecal occult blood (FOB) test to exclude bowel cancer, which has increased in incidence in the UK for reasons unknown. Or if you are looking for a more in-depth investigation, you should request a colonoscopy which entails looking at the bowel with a colonoscopy. This is the gold standard, but an FOB is the next best thing and far less invasive as a first investigative option. It takes no time at all and is a good preventative check.

​​2) Any changes to the breast.

Any breast lumps, skin changes, nipple discharge, nipple changes or pain in the breast must be checked ASAP. Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in the UK and often can present insidiously. Get to know what your breast feels like so that any subtle changes can be detected as early as possible.

3) Skin lesions that do not heal.

Any scab on the skin which does not heal, especially around the eyes, nose, ears and face should be checked. All these areas are the most sun-exposed, and, as such, are more at risk of skin cancer. If these lesions are picked up and treated early, scarring is minimal, but if left, then disfiguring scars and skin grafts may be necessary.

4) Bleeding after the menopause.

If you experience any bleeding after 1-year of your last menstrual period, you must visit your GP for further investigation. Bleeding after the menopause is not common and could be an indicator of cancer of the uterus, or the cervix. They will usually opt for a biopsy of the uterine lining to exclude both – don’t worry, this doesn’t hurt.

5) Always have regular cervical screens. 

Most people don’t find cervical screens painful, although they can feel somewhat uncomfortable. If you are concerned about the pain or you have previously found the procedure painful with the NHS, you can opt to book a private appointment. It is important that you don’t miss your appointment. 

6) Bleeding between periods.

At any age, you should never ignore bleeding between periods or after intercourse, as this can be a sign of cervical or uterine cancer. Whilst cervical cancer is monitored by regular screening, it is important to still get bleeding between periods checked out following a normal smear result. Cancer of the endometrium is becoming increasingly common in women who have not had children.

7) A persistent cough.

Regardless of gender, you should get a persistent cough checked out by your doctor, especially if you are coughing up discoloured sputum or blood.

8) Any unexplained changes to your body.

Any new indigestion, shortness of breath on exertion, neck or left arm pain requires follow up ASAP. Make sure a GP examines your chest and makes the appropriate investigations.

The same applies to calf pain or any pain in the chest. By taking a full history, examining you and doing quick and easy investigations, worrying conditions can be excluded, such as a pulmonary embolism or a heart attack.

Some recent examples of cases where other healthcare providers have failed our new female patients:

1) We saw a 36 year old who had not had a cervical screening for 5-years because the last one was so painful. The NHS advises a screening every 3-years but we advise yearly screenings to ensure any abnormalities are found as early as possible. 5-years is far too long!

2) We saw a woman who had a suspicious lump at her anal margin, which her usual GP had told her was part of her bladder. She wanted a second opinion because it had grown in size and was now painful. The patient was referred for an urgent assessment to exclude cancer.

3) We saw an 88 year old patient who was disfigured by a large basal cell carcinoma on her forehead, about which she was embarrassed. The patient had been seen by a dermatologist who had frightened her about having the lesion removed by saying she might not survive an anaesthetic. The patient wished that she had taken the risk and asked to be referred back, as the skin lesion was disfiguring and ruining her quality of life.

** The outcomes of these patients are yet unknown, but they are all certainly serious health concerns that should have been properly addressed long before now. 

We want to encourage women to take ownership over their health and be assertive when they feel that something has changed from our normal. If they feel like they are not being taken seriously or not being heard, they should seek a second opinion. 

If you cannot get an appointment with your usual GP or through the NHS, rather than waiting  for weeks and worrying about what it could be, make an appointment with a private GP who can usually see you on the same day! 

Put your mind at ease with private healthcare.

How to avoid fragility as we age

03.03.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Ageing is an inevitable part of living. As we age, many physical and psychological changes affect our overall health and these vary from person to person.

The general myth is that as you age, you become more fragile and that this is unavoidable. This is most certainly not the case. There are always things we can do to help keep healthy in our older years and these changes can slow down or even prevent certain health conditions from developing.

The term “fragile” is defined as not “strong or sturdy; delicate and vulnerable” and is most often used to describe older ladies. One particular age-related health issue that supports this description would be osteoporosis. 

Osteoporosis is a degenerative disease that weakens and thins the bones which makes them fragile and more likely to break and is becoming increasingly common. It is much more prevalent in women than men due to the menopause directly affecting hormone balances and this directly affects bone density. It is important to prevent osteoporosis as we age as 75% of fractures due to osteoporosis occur in people aged 65 and over. 

There are several things you can do to help prevent osteoporosis:

1) Do regular, weight bearing physical activity.
The lack of regular exercise will result in loss of bone and muscle, so adults who are inactive are more likely to have a hip fracture than those who are more active. Adults should aim to do at least two and a half hours of moderate-intensity exercise every week. Weight bearing and resistance training are a particularly great way of improving bone density and helping to prevent osteoporosis. 

2) Eat plenty of calcium and Vitamin D containing foods.
Your diet is very important and the nutrients we get from the food we consume will affect how strong our body is. Eat plenty of dairy, seeds, eggs, oily fish, protein, fruit and vegetables. Additionally, try to get at least 15-minutes of sun exposure per day to increase your Vitamin D intake. As we know in the UK, such sun exposure is not always possible during the winter months and, if this is the case, taking a daily Vitamin D supplement is advised. 

3) Maintain a healthy weight.
As you get older, you start to lose lean body mass like muscle and bone density and this can start to happen yearly from the age of 30. Being underweight weakens your bones so it is important to keep your weight in a healthy range. A good indication, although not exact, is your BMI. For most adults, a healthy BMI range is between 18.5 and 24.9, so try not to let your BMI fall below 19.

Those who suffer from eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are at a higher risk of fragility due to the conditions causing further bone density loss. This can happen to anorexic and bulimic sufferers of all ages.

Older people should aim to consume a varied diet, consisting of enough calories for maintaining a healthy weight. 

4) Limit your consumption of alcohol.
We’d recommend that you drink no more than a maximum of 2 units of alcohol per day. Any more than this has been demonstrated to increase the risk of bone fracture. Alcohol abuse has detrimental effects on bone health and increases a person’s risk of developing osteoporosis.

5) Stop smoking and definitely don’t start!
Smoking is a known risk factor for osteoporosis as it increases bone mass loss. In fact, smoking doubles the risk of hip fracture.

Generally, being healthy is the key to avoiding fragility and in particular preventing osteoporosis as we age. Having an annual health medical can highlight any areas of concern. They can monitor the progression of any pre-existing health issues, as well as detect arising conditions in the early stages. You can book your annual medical online

In addition to making healthy lifestyle choices, it is also important to book a doctor’s appointment should you notice any changes to your health. The sooner a health concern is addressed, the easier it is to treat. You can book a GP appointment online.

 

 

BCG & SCID screening:
What you need to know

07.02.2022 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman & Lucy Mildren

In September 2021, Public Health England released new rules surrounding the timing of BCG vaccination, increasing the minimum age of vaccination to 28 days. This has been implemented in line with a pilot disease screening programme that tests eligible newborns for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), the outcome of which becomes available by the time the baby is 6 weeks old. It is important that we wait for the result of this test before giving the BCG vaccine.

What is SCID screening?
All newborn babies in the UK are currently offered blood spot screening (heel prick test) that looks for 9 rare diseases, including sickle cell and cystic fibrosis. The NHS is considering introducing an additional test for Severe Immunodeficiency (SCID), a name given to a group of rare, inherited disorders that cause major abnormalities in the immune system. Affected infants have an increased risk of life-threatening infections and will normally become severely unwell in the first few months of life. Without treatment they will rarely live past their first birthday. About 14 babies a year are born in England with SCID.

The evaluation of this testing, which began on 6th September 2021, is taking place in 6 areas across England and will cover around 60% of new born babies. It is running alongside the existing blood spot screening and the intention is to roll it out nationally once the 2 year evaluation has been made. 

Why does this affect the BCG vaccination?
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is a live attenuated vaccine that can cause problems if given to an immunocompromised person. Treatment for SCID is more complicated if the child has received the BCG vaccine, so it is important that if your child has been tested. We wait for a negative result before vaccinating. 

What we need from you:
If your child was included in the SCID programme, you will need to provide a letter that confirms the negative result of screening.

If your child was born outside of the programme areas and therefore, not included in the SCID programme, we will need to see a letter confirming this. 

In either case, please bring the letter with you to your appointment, as well as your child’s vaccination book.

Nb. If your child was born before 1st September 2021, before the programme was introduced, no letter will be needed. 

 

For more information on:

BCG vaccination

Other Childhood Vaccinations

Winter Health Check

22.01.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

With every change of season comes a host of different medical issues, and winter can be one of the worst. With colder temperatures, shorter days, and seasonal illnesses circulating, it is one of the harder seasons to keep fit and healthy. There are certain conditions which are known to worsen in the colder months and so it is important to be aware of them and how you can best prepare yourself to keep healthy throughout winter. 

These conditions include:

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Circulatory disorders, such as claudication, Raynaud’s disease, and chilblains
  • Ischaemic heart disease
  • Hypothyroidism (if untreated)
  • Osteoarthritis and any joint disorder to include rheumatoid arthritis
  • Seasonal Affective disorder
  • Allergic rhinitis

To reduce the increased risk associated with the above conditions, it is important to have a check up with your GP, ideally in the early Autumn before the Winter months. This will give you the best chance of getting ahead and allowing you to prepare for the coming season. But, if for whatever reason, you were unable to have a check up in Autumn, it is still beneficial to have a check up during the Winter months.

During a check up for asthma and COPD it’s advised to have a peak flow and lung function check. Asthma and COPD are worse in the dry, cold weather, so it is important to make sure you have plenty of your prescribed inhalers. It is best to be prepared rather than be taken unawares by an attack of wheezing. It is extremely important to see a doctor if you develop winter wheezing and are short of breath, especially during the night as this is when asthma and COPD attacks are most dangerous.

Circulatory disorders are worse in the cold weather as lower temperatures constrict blood vessels, increasing the likelihood of pain due to claudication (pain in the calves after walking a certain distance), Reynaud’s (discolouration of the fingertips due to constriction of the blood vessels) and chilblains (small, itchy, red patches on the skin). You can prepare for all of these conditions by obtaining prescriptions for treatment but most importantly, by keeping  warm and preparing for the cold.

Ischaemic heart disease is also worse in the cold weather due to the effect of constricting blood vessels. It is important to have a cardiac check to include blood pressure, and if you suffer from angina, to ensure you have the medication to treat this painful condition which is likely to be much worse in the cold weather. Avoiding the extreme cold and wearing thermal clothing may also mitigate against the likelihood of a heart attack or myocardial infarction if you do suffer from Ischaemic heart disease. 

If you suffer from Hypothyroidism, it is a good idea to have an annual blood test. Left untreated, hypothyroidism can cause increased sensitivity to cold, which can be particularly unpleasant in winter.

For those with arthritis of any kind, the best way to avoid pain and stiffness in the joints is to keep warm and keep the joints moving. Find more information on Arthritis in Winter here.

If your mood tends to be lower in the winter months, each year, you should have a check up with your GP to discuss Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). If you are diagnosed with SAD, consider CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) rather than medication if you can, and invest in a daylight lamp as these do help.

Allergic rhinitis is another ailment that tends to crop up a lot around winter time. This is diagnosed when you have a persistent nasal discharge. This can occur either as a result of pine or autumnal tree leaf mould, or due to house dust or mould which is often exacerbated by central heating. In this instance, nasal sprays and antihistamines are often required.

Finally, the Norovirus peaks in November until April. This is a really unpleasant vomiting virus which is picked up from contaminated surfaces or foods. To help avoid this nasty bug, always wash hands when handling food and make sure food is washed thoroughly before cooking or eating raw.

If you know or suspect that you might suffer from any of these conditions, please do visit your GP to help you keep prepared. Similarly, if anything new arises you should see your GP as soon as you can; the earlier a health condition is addressed, the easier it is to treat. 

In general, an annual medical is a good way to give you a full-body overview of your health, as well as monitor the progression of any existing health conditions. A varied, balanced diet and regular exercise will also be crucial in keeping you generally fit and healthy throughout winter.

 

For more information on our GP Services

Book a GP Appointment or an Annual Medical.

What is "Blue Monday"?

17.01.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Will Cave

Blue Monday happens every year on the third Monday of January. It is supposedly the most depressing day of the entire year, based on a crude calculation of bad weather, long nights, back to work dread and post-Christmas debt.  

It does sound very plausible but Blue Monday is in fact, a myth! 

The phrase “Blue Monday” was coined by Sky Travel in 2005 as a way to sell holidays in January. They highlighted all the seasonal negatives to reinforce the benefits of booking a holiday – a clever marketing trick. 

But can we really pinpoint the most depressing day of the year?

There is no actual scientific studies that have ever backed up any claims about Blue Monday being true or that there could even be a “most depressing day of the year”. This does make sense because this would be different for each and every one of us based on personal circumstances and the variables are extensive.

Perhaps then instead of selecting just one day of the year to highlight depression, we should be thinking about mental health, specifically poor mental health, everyday.

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days. It can be long lasting and the symptoms range from mild to severe. Once accessed by a doctor, they will conclude the severity of your depression.

A simplified description follows: Mild depression will have some impact on your daily life, moderate depression has a significant impact on your life and severe depression makes it almost impossible to get through daily life.

Sometimes there’s a trigger for depression. Life-changing events, such as bereavement, losing your job or giving birth, can bring it on. Other times, it can be linked with family history, people with family members who have depression are more likely to experience it themselves. But you can also become depressed for no obvious reason. It is quite complex and each person is unique.

There are many symptoms of depression and the combination is unpredictable. They can be categorised at physiological, physical and social symptoms.

Some examples of psychological symptoms of depression include:

  • continuous low mood or sadness
  • feeling hopeless and helpless
  • having low self-esteem
  • feeling tearful
  • feeling irritable and intolerant of others
  • having no motivation or interest in things
  • finding it difficult to make decisions
  • not getting any enjoyment out of life
  • feeling anxious or worried
  • having suicidal thoughts or thoughts of harming yourself

Some examples of physical symptoms of depression include:

  • moving or speaking slower than usual
  • changes in appetite or weight (usually decreased, but sometimes increased)
  • constipation
  • unexplained aches and pains
  • lack of energy
  • low sex drive
  • changes to your menstrual cycle
  • disturbed sleep – for example, finding it difficult to fall asleep at night or waking up very early in the morning

Some examples of social symptoms of depression include:

  • avoiding contact with friends and taking part in fewer social activities
  • neglecting your hobbies and interests
  • having difficulties in your home, work or family life

The most common symptoms of depression tend to be a low mood, feelings of hopelessness, low self-esteem, lack of energy, problems with sleep and a loss of interest in things you used to enjoy but it can be any number of symptoms listed above. 

It’s important to seek help from a GP if you think you may be depressed. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can be on the way to recovery. 

For more information on GP services at Fleet Street Clinic, click here.

How To Lose Weight Safely And Successfully

14.01.2022 Category: Dietitian Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths and Ruth Kander

Weight loss has become a thriving industry and we’re bombarded constantly with unhealthy FAD diets, weight loss programmes, influencers selling teas and pills all promising to help us lose weight. Many of these are promoting quick fixes which are not advised by doctors or dieticians. It can be really hard to know what information to trust. To help navigate the sea of information (and misinformation!) surrounding weight loss, we have asked one of our GPs, Dr Belinda Griffiths, and our dietitian, Ruth Kander, their advice on how to lose weight safely and successfully. 

Firstly, it is important to note that weight loss should be consistent and gradual as it can be dangerous to lose too much weight too quickly. Dr Griffiths suggests that “a safe weight loss is 1-2 lbs or 0.5-1kg per week… Greater weight loss than this per week can lead to malnutrition, exhaustion, increased risk of gout and gallstones.” There is also an increased risk of developing an unhealthy relationship with food which, in extreme circumstances, could lead to eating disorders. 

Ruth added, “Losing weight gradually and at a healthy rate is key.” Remember, it’s all about consistency! Perseverance will amount to healthy lifestyle changes which will allow you to achieve your weight loss goal. 

Don’t underestimate diet

Both Dr Griffiths and Ruth agree that diet is the most important factor when it comes to weight loss. As Ruth explains; “having a healthy balanced diet that is lower in calories than our body uses is a good way to start the weight loss journey. If we don’t reduce calorie intake, one won’t lose weight:.”  – this is known as being in a calorie deficit. The amount of calories that will result in weight loss will vary from person to person and depend on the amount of exercise the individual does. In order to lose weight, you will need to burn more calories than are consumed and therefore restricting your calorie intake is the simplest way of losing weight. 

Foods to focus on

Ruth recommends that “people should focus on a variety of foods when trying to lose weight”. While Dr Griffiths suggests, “focusing on a range of lean proteins (including meat and fish), vegetables, high fibre foods (such as quinoa, bran flakes etc) and fruit in moderation”. Vegetarians can substitute in lentils, nuts, beans and tofu instead of meat and fish. In general, high calorie foods such as fried food, cakes, biscuits, chocolate and sugary drinks should be avoided. 

Let’s get physical!

Although weight loss is still achievable without much exercise, incorporating exercise into your lifestyle will not only aid weight loss, but will generally improve your overall health. Any exercise is better than none whether it be tennis, swimming, or even walking, “whatever you are capable of, just do it!” is Dr Griffiths advice. Ideally, a combination of exercise is best for weight loss – this includes cardio / fat burning and resistance or weight training. Get those steps in! An easy way to incorporate more exercise into your daily routine is by aiming to walk at least 10,000 steps per day. This easy change can make a big difference and remember, as Dr Griffiths says “the more exercise you do, the greater calories are burned” – it’s as simple as that!

Don’t forget about NEAT movements! 

NEAT (or Non-exercise activity thermogenesis) movement refers to the physical movement we do day-to-day that isn’t necessarily planned exercise and “encompasses the energy that we expend by simply living”.This includes the calories we burn breathing, eating, sleeping etc. Dr Griffiths suggests that “you can increase NEAT movement easily in your everyday life by making simple changes such as taking the stairs rather than the lift, by standing rather than sitting, by walking instead of taking the train/ bus/ tube or even by carrying bags rather than having items delivered”. It all adds up! These simple swaps will increase the number of calories you burn and help facilitate weight loss. 

What to do when you plateau

The first stint of weight loss can make it seem a little too easy as you tend to lose weight more easily in the beginning, but a common issue lots of people face is when weight loss reaches a plateau. This is where you stop losing weight to the same extent you were before, or stop losing weight for a period of time. This can feel disheartening and more often than not, people tend to give up at this stage. Dr Griffiths states at this point “it is a case of persevering with calorie restriction and regular exercise and gradually weight loss will resume.” If it doesn’t, Ruth suggests “ looking at what you’re eating to see if anything has slipped”. She states “maybe you’re not taking into consideration extra calories here and there” but they all add up. See if there are any areas of your diet where you could be a little stricter, or consider starting or upping your exercise. 

Sleep and Stress

A good night’s sleep and keeping your stress levels down will be your friend when it comes to weight loss. “In order to lose weight, you need to be in the correct frame of mind and life circumstances” says Ruth. Research has shown that you tend to eat more and make poorer food choices, including seeking comfort food, when you are sleep deprived. This is because not getting enough sleep “disrupts the hormones in your brain (Leptin and Ghrelin) that control appetite” says Dr Griffiths. 

Stress can also play a part in weight loss as Dr Griffiths explains that “stress increases cortisol levels which increases gastric acid output and makes you feel anxious and hungry”. Ruth adds “there is also a theory that being stressed can limit weight loss in terms of hormonal activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis which can lead to the release of hormones that can limit weight loss”. Keeping it simple, “to lose weight, good sleep and minimal stress would be ideal”. 

Final thoughts

Trying to lose weight can seem complicated, confusing and difficult, but when you really break it down, the ingredients to losing weight successfully are actually very straightforward. If you stick to these simple rules and you are patient and consistent, the weight will come off and you will achieve your goals. 

If you feel that you are doing everything right and you still aren’t losing weight, or are even putting weight on, there could be something else causing this. You may have an undiagnosed underlying medical condition and we’d advise you to visit your GP to make sure everything is well. 

If you would like any extra support with your weight loss, why not book an appointment with Ruth. Or if you have any concerns over your health, please book an appointment with one of our GPs.

Arthritis in Winter

11.01.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Will Cave

Arthritis is a common condition that causes pain and inflammation in joints. It is not a single disease but an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 types of arthritis and related conditions. There are thought to be 10 million people with some form of arthritis in the UK. It is the most common cause of disability in the UK and can affect people of all ages but it does occur more frequently as people get older.

Common arthritis joint symptoms include swelling, pain, stiffness and decreased range of motion. Symptoms can range dramatically from person to person, with some experiencing mild symptoms with occasional flare ups to those who experience constant debilitating pain everyday. The sad truth is that there is no cure for arthritis, so it is all about pain management and how to best reduce flare ups.

The impact of the weather on the symptoms of arthritis has been debated for many years and people tend to report more arthritis flare-ups in the winter, but the reason why is not specifically known.

Quite often sufferers will state that their symptoms get worse when the weather is damp and cold and some state they are able to tell when the weather is about to change based on their arteritis symptoms worsening.

Even if there is currently nothing to support this scientifically, this doesn’t remove the pain felt by sufferers and so rather than comment on where this is true or not, let’s look at ways to reduce flare ups in winter.

Our top 4 tips:

1. Stay warm
When the temperature drops both inside and outside, dress warmly. Make sure all arthritis prone areas are kept warm.

2. Stay hydrated
Drink plenty of water throughout the day. Even mild dehydration might make you more sensitive to pain.

3. Take warm baths
A warm bath or visiting a heated swimming pool will ease joint pain and comfort you. If you visit a heated swimming pool, gentle exercise will also help your mobility.

4. Stay active
It is now clear that active people experience less joint pain than those who are sedentary. If you are experiencing an arthritic flare then reduce your usual activity (but don’t stop altogether) and use simple anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen if it is safe for you to do so.

 

Enjoy winter while taking the above precautions for Arthritis.
If you are facing extreme discomfort and pain in your joints due to arthritis, book an appointment with a GP to discuss your options.

Beat the January blues

05.01.2022 Category: General Health Author: Dr Will Cave

If you are feeling sad at the start of the year, don’t worry, you are not alone. 

Although it comes around every year, we always seem to be caught off-guard by what has now commonly become known as “The January Blues”.

The January blues is another name for situational depression and is associated with the way we think and feel. Around this time of year, the weather is cold and gloomy, the days are shorter and the nights are longer, plus you may be experiencing post-Christmas exhaustion, debt and perhaps even dread going back to work. 

Symptoms of the January blues are things such as low mood and sadness, lack of motivation, tiredness and low energy. These are all normal feelings, if temporary. 

Most likely, your negative mood will be brought on by the anticlimax of reality after the exciting events of December & the New Year. Ever heard that old phrase, “don’t cry because it has ended, but smile because it happened”? Find comfort in knowing that you are absolutely not alone in feeling blue in January. In fact, many people in the UK feel especially down in January but the good news is that the January Blues are temporary and typically only last a couple of weeks. You don’t need to take any medication as your thoughts and feelings should naturally return to normal.

If it doesn’t and you are experiencing prolonged or worsening thoughts and feelings, you may actually have Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD, which is different. SAD is clinical depression caused by a person’s biology. It is much longer-lasting, sometimes months on end and likely to occur every year in winter. You should see a doctor to discuss your symptoms as if you have SAD, a range of treatments are available to assist recovery. More information on SAD can be found here.

Remember, please be kind to yourself and know that you’re not alone.

 

For more information on our GP Services.

To book a GP appointment online, click here.

Reasons Weight Gain May Not Be Your Fault

21.12.2021 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Most people experience fluctuations with their weight and it is common to gain weight naturally as we age. For the most part, diet changes, eating more or reducing exercise are the main causes for gaining weight. However, if a person gains weight in a short period of time for no reason, this could be the sign of an undiagnosed, underlying health condition. There are several conditions and circumstances that are known to cause weight gain, some of which can be serious and require medical attention. 

Here are just some medical conditions which can cause sudden weight gain:

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) 

This is a hormonal condition which affects the way a woman’s ovaries work. A common symptom of PCOS is weight gain, particularly around one’s middle. Weight gain is rarely the sole symptom, it is usually part of multiple symptoms including acne, excessive hair, irregular periods and/ or thinning hair. PCOS makes women less sensitive to insulin or cause insulin-resistance which can lead to weight gain and secondary conditions such as diabetes.

Hypothyroidism

A common cause of unexplained weight gain in men and women comes from having an underactive thyroid. This is because when a thyroid is underactive it doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormones, which in turn affects your metabolism, slowing it down. Hypothyroidism can be diagnosed with a thyroid function test and if diagnosed, it can be easily treated with a replacement hormonal tablets. 

Cushing’s syndrome

This is a rare hormonal disorder which is caused by elevated levels of cortisol in the body. Cortisol is responsible for regulating metabolism and appetite, which means elevated levels can slow down your metabolism as well as increase hunger, both of which can cause weight gain.

Insomnia / chronic lack of sleep

Being sleep deprived can result in making poor food choices, including seeking unhealthy foods and eating more than usual. This is thought to be because a lack of sleep disrupts the hormones in the brain (Leptin and Ghrelin) that are responsible for appetite. 

Medication 

Certain medications affect metabolism which can cause weight gain and weight loss. Medications such as steroid medication can cause weight gain, bloating and swelling due to water retention. 

Lipoedema

This is a problem caused by an issue with the lymphatic system that causes an abnormal build-up of fat in the legs and sometimes the arms. This usually results in the upper body being generally a much smaller size compared to the lower half of the body but typically affects both sides of the body equally. This condition can also be painful and cause tenderness or heaviness in the limbs. Lipoedema mainly affects women and it is rare in men. 

Chronic stress, depression and/ or anxiety

Mental health issues can sometimes cause people to turn to food as a coping mechanism, often triggering compulsive eating behaviours. Additionally, higher cortisol levels are often found in people with depression which is known to increase appetite and the motivation to eat. Antidepressant medication can also increase hunger as they interfere with serotonin levels – a neurotransmitter that regulates appetite. 

Menopause

Women going through the menopause often experience weight gain. Changing hormone levels affect the way the body stores fat and can cause women’s bodies to store, rather than burn, calories. Women also generally need less calories after the menopause, and so, if you do not adjust your calorie intake, you are likely to put on weight. 

PMS

During PMS (premenstrual syndrome), progesterone levels surge and dip which are known to increase appetite (the cause of which are unknown). PMS can also cause weight gain as a result of water retention. 

While many of these causes are rare, they are possible and anyone experiencing unexplained weight gain should visit their GP to rule out anything that may require medical care or treatment. It’s always best to be on the safe side! And if everything is normal, your GP can provide you with tips and advice on how to manage your weight gain. 

 

If you are experiencing unexplained or sudden weight gain, or think you might be displaying symptoms of the conditions mentioned above, please book a GP appointment today.

The health benefits of sleep

19.07.2021 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Sleep is one of our greatest allies when it comes to health and wellbeing. It is associated with a number of health benefits which can have a huge positive impact on our daily lives.

Conversely, a lack of sleep can be detrimental – research has even found that not getting enough sleep can negatively impact some aspects of brain function to a similar degree as alcohol intoxication!

Dr Belinda Griffiths discusses some of the mental and physical health benefits of getting a good night’s sleep. 

Immune System

During sleep, your body releases cytokines, which are essential for the regulation of the immune system. Cytokines are required in increased amounts when you are attacked by a pathogen (when you’re ill) or under stress. The level of cytokines increases during sleep, and therefore lack of sleep hinders the body’s ability to fight infections. This is also the reason why the body tends to sleep more while suffering from an infection. 

Weight Control

When you’re well-rested, you’re less hungry. Being sleep deprived disrupts the hormones in your brain (Leptin and Ghrelin) that control appetite.

With those out of balance, your resistance to the temptation of unhealthy foods goes way down. And when you’re tired, you’re less likely to want to get up and move your body. Together, it’s a recipe for putting on the pounds!

Athletic Achievement

If your sport requires quick bursts of energy, like wrestling or weightlifting, sleep loss may not affect you as much as endurance sports like running, swimming, and biking. But you’re not doing yourself any favours. Besides robbing you of your energy and time for muscle repair, lack of sleep saps your motivation, which is what gets you across the finish line. You’ll face a harder mental and physical challenge – and see slower reaction times. Proper rest sets you up for your best performance. 

Memory

When you’re tired, you can have difficulty recalling information. That’s because sleep plays a big part in both learning and memory. Without sufficient sleep, the brain finds it difficult to focus and take in new information in the first place and then doesn’t have enough time to properly store information as short-term memories. Sleep helps enable you to retain memories and store information.

Sleep also allows for your mind to rest, repair and rebuild, the same way it does for your body. As you sleep, your brain begins to organise and process all the information you’ve taken in during the day. It converts these short-term memories into long-term memories – this helps you to learn.

Concentration 

Not sleeping properly can mean that both your body and brain don’t function properly the next day. It can impair your attention span, concentration, strategic thinking, risk assessment, reaction times and problem-solving skills. This is particularly important if you have a big decision to make, are driving, or are operating heavy machinery. So, getting plenty of sleep can help you stay sharp and focused all day long. 

Mood 

Another thing your brain does while you sleep is process your emotions. Your mind needs this time in order to recognise and react in the right way. When you cut that short, you tend to have more negative emotional reactions and fewer positive ones. Lack of sleep can cause bad temper and anxiety, so the better you sleep, the better your ability to stay calm, controlled and reasonable. 

Chronic lack of sleep can also raise your chance of having a mood disorder. One large study found that people with insomnia were five times more likely to develop depression, and the odds of having anxiety or panic disorders are even greater.

A refreshing slumber helps you hit the reset button on a bad day, improve your outlook on life, and be better prepared to meet the challenges of the next day.

Heart Health 

While you sleep, your blood pressure goes down giving your heart and blood vessels a bit of a rest. The less sleep you get, the longer your blood pressure stays up during a 24-hour cycle. High blood pressure can lead to heart disease and strokes. Therefore, it is important to keep your blood pressure down. 

Pain Threshold

Poor sleep and pain mutually reinforce each other. Sleep deprivation increases pain sensitivity and reduces pain tolerance. Therefore, something will feel more painful when you’re tired. 

It is clear that sleep is an essential part of helping us stay physically and mentally healthy. What better excuse to have a few extra hours of sleep a day! 

If have any concerns about your health, book a GP appointment today.

Is Your Sleep Position Impacting Your Sleep Quality?

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Vaccinations for Students

26.08.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

STUDENTS URGED TO GET MENINGITIS ACWY VACCINATION

Public Health England is encouraging students and university freshers to get the Meningitis ACWY vaccination before they start college or university this autumn. Cases of meningitis have risen rapidly since 2009 due to a particularly virulent strain of the Men W & Men B bacteria.

The Men ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W, and Y.

WHAT IS MENINGITIS W?

Meningitis is a bacterial infection of the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Meningococcal meningitis (Men W) is a highly serious form of bacterial meningitis that can lead to septicaemia. It is spread by droplets that come from a person who is infected with the bacteria.

Although the strain is most likely to affect babies, statistics reveal that older children, teenagers, and adults are also at risk. In recent times, cases amongst normally healthy teenagers have spiked and the fatality percentage is higher with Meningitis W than it is with the most common strains, Meningitis B and C.

Early symptoms of Meningitis W include headaches, fever, vomiting, cold feet and hands or muscular pain. All of which could be mistaken for stress or a heavy night out, which is one of the theories as to why students are such high-risk.

Protection against this strain of Meningitis W is provided through the Meningitis ACWY vaccine. Only one dose is required.  We also carry an excellent stock of the Meningitis B vaccine and can provide both vaccinations at the same time should you require it.

Other Vaccines that are recommended for students starting University:

Fresher’s Flu:


  • Every year different flu strains circulate and infect millions of people. Being exposed to a new pool of infections in University accommodation can increase the risk of catching the flu. Having the flu jab before you go to University will help protect you against the flu and stop you getting sick.

MMR:


  • Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection which is spread in the same way as the flu. Coughing, sneezing and kissing can rapidly spread the infection, especially in the close quarters of student accommodation.
  •  Measles is a very infectious viral infection which is also spread by coughing and sneezing. There have been multiple outbreaks of Measles around the world including the UK this year, so it’s important to make sure you are protected as you socialise with new peers.

Both Mumps and Measles can be prevented by safe and effective vaccination, MMR.

BCG:


  • If you are from outside the UK, you should be vaccinated against tuberculosis (TB) before you enter the UK.  A weakened strain of tuberculosis, the BCG Vaccine, is injected to protect against the infection. Those unsure of their immunity can have a simple Mantoux test to confirm.

HPV:


  • HPV is a common virus that is passed on via genital contact. There are more than 100 HPV types which infect genital areas. Sometimes they cause no harm and the infection can go away on its own. However, the virus can persist and cause cells to change which can lead to genital warts or some forms of cancer. The HPV vaccine is offered at our clinic for girls and boys to protect against HPV.

Tetanus:


  • Tetanus is a rare condition caused by bacteria entering a wound. We recommend making sure you are up to date with your DTP vaccinations and boosters before leaving for university. This vaccine protects against tetanus as well as Diptheria and Polio. Don’t let a cut or burn ruin your freshers week.

VACCINATION AT THE FLEET STREET CLINIC

Fleet Street Clinic offers a friendly environment and a team of experienced medics to administer all vaccinations. We meet rigorous quality management standards to ensure we offer you the highest standards of clinical care: you can feel confident you are in safe hands.

Secure your peace of mind by ensuring you are protected.  Get your vaccines before university starts to receive protection in time.

Book your vaccination appointment today

How Acupuncture can support healthy well-being

19.07.2019 Category: General Health Author: Diane Timewell

The health of both our planet and its people is, without doubt, one of the most important issues of our time. Maintaining healthy wellbeing has been in the public eye for some time now, particularly the topic of how to achieve good mental health. Chinese medical thought and acupuncture treatment can help us understand what we can do to help ourselves to achieve and maintain good health. Its teachings encourage us to inhabit our body, to connect to and to nourish our physical self and the physical world around us. This physical basis provides the root of our mental and emotional well-being.

A holistic treatment

Where Western Scientific Medicine has gone down the microscope to discover the minutiae workings of the human body (cells, biochemicals, genes), the understandings of Chinese Medicine, developed over thousands of years, have focused on how the body systems work together. It observes a person in their environment, their lifestyle, their posture… to understand the causes of ill-health, and the symptoms that arise to alert us to this. The whole body-mind is considered, and treated, to bring us back to good health and well-being.

A leap of faith for our Western minds

Acupuncture is a leap of faith for our Western minds. The concepts on which it is based do not exist in Western thought. You can’t cut open the body and find the meridians which form the energetic framework of the human body, or the Qi (pronounced ‘chee’, meaning energy) which flows through this network to motivate our physiological processes. Similarly, you can’t cut open a light bulb and find electricity. Likewise, you cannot cut open a computer and find cyberspace. It doesn’t mean that these things don’t exist. Proof of their existence lies in their application and the same is true of acupuncture treatment. Only through experiencing acupuncture for yourself will you be able to judge its true value.

Acupuncture helps reduce stress

Acupuncture is often described as incredibly relaxing, regardless of what a person seeks treatment for. Furthermore, most patients report an improvement in energy levels, sleep and a feeling of general well-being.

Acupuncture helps calm the nervous system. As a result, it helps switch off the ‘Fight-Flight’ stress response. Fuelled by adrenaline to keep us alert and primed for action, the stress response helps us to achieve. It is a useful tool for success. If the stress reaction is prolonged and not switched off, problems start to arise.

Heart rate increases, breathing quickens, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises .. it is perhaps not surprising that stress-related ailments are estimated to account for 75-90% of all doctor’s visits. By calming the body and promoting parasympathetic activity, Acupuncture helps improve circulation and reduce general muscle tension. This enhances all body functions not concerned with immediate survival –  immunity, digestion, fertility, rest, recovery, repair. Generally speaking, the results note an overall feeling of relaxation and well-being.

Acupuncture helps manage day-to-day ailments

Our Acupuncturist, Diane, has 25 years experience in Chinese Medicine. She treats a wide variety of day-to-day ailments. Including headaches, IBS, anxiety, infertility. As well as the musculoskeletal pain, which acupuncture is most famous for. Why not book an appointment today to see how acupuncture can help you improve your health and well-being?

If you think you could benefit from acupuncture, you can book your appointment online.

By Diane Timewell |  Acupuncturist | July 2019

Health Advice: Protecting health from rising temperatures and extreme heat

17.07.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO), HAS REPORTED THAT POPULATION EXPOSURE TO HEAT IS INCREASING DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE.

The WHO states, ‘global temperatures and the frequency and intensity of heatwaves will rise in the 21st century as a result of climate change’. Extended periods of heat exposure during the day and night time can increase the amount of physiological stress on the human body.’

The stress caused by heat exposure exacerbates the top causes of death globally. This includes respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and renal disease.

They go on to state, ‘Exposure to excessive heat has wide-ranging physiological impacts for all humans, often amplifying existing conditions and resulting in premature death and disability.’

With the temperature said to continue rising, the WHO also states, ‘Awareness remains insufficient of the health risks posed by heatwaves and prolonged exposure to increased temperatures.’

 So, who is most affected by heat exposure and how will it impact your health?

Who is affected?

Rising temperatures affect the whole population. However, some populations are more vulnerable to exposure to excessive heat. Those include:

  • Elderly people
  • Infants and children
  • Pregnant women
  • Outdoor and manual workers 
  • Athletes
  • Poorer communities

How does heat impact health?

With rapid increases in external temperatures, the body will struggle to regulate our internal temperatures. The knock-on effect of this can result in a number of heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and hyperthermia. Reported small differences in the seasonal changes have been reported to have increased the number of heat-related illness and even death. Rising temperatures can also worsen chronic conditions such as cardiovascular, respiratory, and cerebrovascular disease and diabetes-related conditions.

What actions can you take to stay cool?

  • Aim to keep your living space cool. WHO suggests ‘below 32 °C during the day and 24 °C during the night’
  • If it is safe, open your windows at night time to cool your living space.
  • Stay out of the heat by staying in the shade and avoiding going outside during the hottest part of the day.
  • Take cool showers and wear loose-fitting clothing.
  • Drink regularly and avoid alcohol and caffeine.
  • Check on vulnerable family members who may be affected by the heat.

What to do if someone shows signs of a heat emergency?

It is extremely important to know what to do when someone is showing signs of heat illness. Everyone should know how to respond to heat emergencies, this can be learnt in first aid courses. 

If one of your family members or someone you assist is showing signs of hot dry skin and delirium, convulsions and/or unconsciousness, call a doctor/ambulance immediately.
Whilst you are waiting for help to arrive place them in a cool place in a horizontal position and elevate their legs. It is now important to initiate external cooling. 

This can be done by: 

  • Removing clothing
  • Placing cold packs on the neck and groin 
  • Spraying cool water on their skin 
  • Fanning them
  • If they are unconscious, place them on their side

If you or someone you are with is displaying mild signs of heat illness that is not considered an emergency, you might want to consider a same-day GP appointment. You can book an appointment online.

Heatwave Health Tips

19.06.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

How to Cope During a Heatwave

The UK is currently experiencing a heatwave with temperatures rising to 35 degrees in some parts of the country this week. While sunshine is welcome and the vitamin D is much needed, too much heat can lead to illness. To avoid any heat-related sickness, make sure you are well-prepared! Follow Fleet Street Clinic’s tips to help keep safe during the hot weather.

Risks During the Heat:

  • Exposure to such high temperatures increases sweating, and results in loss of fluid and electrolytes causing rapid dehydration. This can result in heat exhaustion or heatstroke which can be life threatening if not dealt with promptly.
  • The highest risk  groups are the elderly, babies, children and those with pre-existing medical conditions.
  • If you engage in strenuous physical activity this will increase the risk of illness related to the heat.

Top 7 Tips For Beating the Heat

  1. Seek shelter and shade during the middle of the day (11am -3pm).
  2. If you are outside, ensure you protect your skin against the sun with a high factor sun cream, hat and sunglasses.
  3. Wear loose fitting, light-weight and light colour clothing.
  4. Keep hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids and eating food with a high water content (such as fruit).
  5. Ensure you are taking in sufficient salt in your diet (sweating leads to electrolyte and salt depletion).
  6. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can worsen heat-related illness.
  7. Heat stroke can be a life-threatening emergency and medical help should be sought.

About Fleet Street Clinic

Fleet Street Clinic is an independent healthcare practice in London. For more advice or to book an appointment with our expert medical team, you can book online.

Protecting your health from rising temperatures and extreme heat

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Festival Fever: Get, Set and Go for Glasto

01.06.2019 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Glastonbury has been going for over 50 years and is back this year following a fallow year last year.

Whether you are a festival first-timer or a seasoned Glastonbury veteran, make sure you follow our top tips on how to stay healthy during festival season.

First things first, facilities…

A major part of festival fun is the back to nature approach to living, so do expect basic living facilities. Facilities at festivals are confined to porta-loos, long drops and communal showers;  a perfect breeding ground for bugs. Dodge the diarrhoea by following some simple rules. Wash your hands where possible, especially before eating and always after the toilet. If running water isn’t available, use hand wipes or hand sanitiser. Pack your own pocket-size alcohol hand gel for when you are on the go.

The Vaccines…

Don’t be fooled into thinking vaccinations are only for those far-flung destinations. Glastonbury is the largest greenfield festival in the world and over the course of a week, home to over 175,000 people. Crowded spaces and shared living areas increase the risk of infectious diseases spreading. Many of which are entirely vaccine preventable. Measles and mumps cases have been on the rise in the UK, so festival goers should check they have received at least 2 doses of the MMR vaccination to ensure they are protected. If there is any doubt you can get immunity tested to put your mind at ease. Young adults and children can also be particularly vulnerable to meningitis, so if you are in this group, make sure that you have also received the recommended  Meningitis ACWY vaccination.

You can find more information on all our vaccinations here.

Eat, drink and be merry…

It is estimated that an average festival goer burns around 9,000 calories and walks over 15 miles. Make sure you fuel your festival by eating plenty, especially if you are drinking alcohol. Keep hydrated and ensure you drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration, especially on those (potentially) hot days.

Come rain or shine…

Glastonbury has seen it all:  heatwaves, rain, floods, cloudless skies. The Great British weather is never predictable and exposure to extreme weather can cause anything from hypothermia to heat stroke. Be prepared for all eventualities. Take warm waterproof clothes that will dry quickly in case of wet weather. Pack cool, light coloured clothing to help you keep cool in the sun. Pack a hat and some good suncream and make sure you wear it! Shady areas are few and far between if you are centre stage for the day, and without sun protection you could end up with sunburn, or worse, heat stroke. You can lean more about staying safe in the heat here.

STI’s

Don’t run the risk of sexually transmitted infections if you decide to go beyond social intercourse. The best way to prevent infections such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea is to use condoms. Some STI’s can take several weeks to present themselves, and in some cases are asymptomatic (display no symptoms at all). It is quick and easy to get checked for STI’s, so if you have any concerns when the festival is over, make sure you get tested.

You can book appointments for all our services online.

HPV Vaccine Available For Boys and Girls

19.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

What is HPV?

Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is the name of a group of viruses with around 200 different types, that is most commonly passed on via genital contact.

Although HPV is highly common, 90% of HPV infections go away by themselves and do not cause any harm. Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems.

However, it is possible for HPV infections to persist and cause cellular change in your body. This can lead to:

  • Cancer of the cervix, vulva, and vagina in women
  • Precancerous lesions in men and women
  • Genital warts in men and women
  • Head and neck cancers in men and women

HPV vaccines have a well-established role in preventing cervical cancers as well as these other aforementioned conditions.

Who Should Be Vaccinated against HPV?

In theory, HPV vaccines are best given to young people before they become sexually active, and therefore before they can be exposed to HPV.

Individuals who are already sexually active might also benefit as they may not have yet acquired all of the HPV strains covered by the vaccine. Patients aged under 16 can only be vaccinated with their parents present.

Why Boys should receive the HPV Vaccine

  • About 15% of UK girls who are eligible for vaccination are currently not receiving both doses. This figure is much higher in some areas
  • Most older women in the UK have not had the HPV vaccination
  • Men may have sex with women from other countries which have no vaccination programme
  • Men who have sex with men are not protected by the girls’ programme
  • The cost of treating HPV-related diseases is high: treating anogenital warts alone in the UK is estimated to cost £58 million a year, while the additional cost of vaccinating boys has been estimated to cost about £20 million a year

Source: HPV Action 

To book an HPV vaccination for yourself or your child, you can book an appointment online. Or find out more information about HPV here.

New HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, offer more protection

Read more

Sepsis - Know the Signs

19.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Sepsis Signs:
World Sepsis Day – 13 September

Sepsis is a global health crisis and affects 27 to 30 million people every year. Out of those affected, 7 to 9 million dies. That’s one death every 3.5 seconds.

Sometimes called the silent killer, Sepsis is a bacterial infection of the blood which can become life-threatening. It is very hard to detect in the early stages, with symptoms similar to many other conditions and illnesses. In the UK alone, around 37,000 people die from sepsis each year.

Thankfully, due to public awareness increasing due to medical bodies and health campaigns, sepsis is being talked about more. As a result, parents and doctors have the condition forefront-of-their mind. The condition is treatable with early recognition and care.

Causes of Sepsis

Bacterial infections are the most common causes of Sepsis. However, Sepsis can also be caused by infections like seasonal influenza viruses, dengue viruses, and highly transmissible pathogens.

Children under 1, the elderly and those with chronic diseases and a weakened immune system are most at risk of sepsis.

Symptoms of Sepsis

Sepsis can display in a variety of ways including:

  • Slurred speech or confusion

  • Extreme shivering or muscle pain or fever

  • Passing no urine all-day

  • Severe breathlessness

  • It feels like you’re going to die

  • Skin mottled or discoloured

 

If someone is ill and is getting progressively worse with two or more of the above symptoms, then it is advised for you to go to A & E without delay.

Sepsis Signs
Sepsis Signs

Preventing Sepsis

Preventing infection in the first place is the best way to prevent Sepsis from occurring.
This can be done by:

  • Vaccinations – protect yourself from diseases which if serious, could lead to Sepsis.
  • Hand Hygiene – reduce the spread of diseases and infections.
  • Safe Childbirth – reducing infection to the mother and baby.
  • Awareness of Sepsis– knowing the causes and symptoms can save lives.

If you think you are experiencing symptoms of sepsis, you should call 111 as you may require immediate medial attention.

For general GP health checks or vaccinations, you can book an appointment online.

What is Stress?

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Mental Health Awareness Week: What Is Stress?

Look around your office, do you know if anyone is struggling?

You may think those around you – fellow colleagues or your staff – are completely fine. But mental health affects us all and problems in the workplace are actually very common.

According to mental health charity Mind, at least one in six workers are experiencing common mental health problems, including anxiety and depression.

Nowadays, there is increasing recognition of stress and mental health problems, both within the workplace and in everyday life. Currently, following Stress Awareness Month in April, we are approaching Mental Health Awareness Week, which takes place from 13-19th May.

We thought it might be helpful to focus on some positive strategies to help, in terms of stress management and resilience. Whilst being particularly useful and relevant within the workplace, these can all be used in everyday life as well.

WHAT IS STRESS?


In its purest form, stress is the body’s reaction to something it perceives as dangerous or threatening. When we feel under attack, our bodies respond by producing a mixture of hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol. These prepare us for physical action by diverting blood away from our core and into our limbs. It also temporarily shuts down some less vital bodily functions such as digestion.

For immediate, short-term situations, stress can be beneficial to your health, by helping you cope with potentially serious situations.

Yet if your stress response continues, and stress levels stay elevated far longer than necessary, it can take a toll on your health.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO TACKLE STRESS?


Chronic stress can cause a variety of symptoms, contribute to many health problems (such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and diabetes, anxiety and depression) and affect your overall well-being.

Reducing stress can help prevent these harmful effects on both mind and body.

Looking after yourself and ensuring you have good mental health has many benefits – not just for you as an individual, but for the business too. Employees are generally more productive, passionate and motivated when in good health. Even if they’re experiencing mental health problems, knowing they are supported by their employer can help in the recovery process.

STRESS PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN STRESS MANAGEMENT


Ultimately, the best way to manage stress is through prevention rather than cure.

Research shows that those who are better informed about the practical ways in which they can lower their stress levels are far better able to tackle difficult situations with emotional resilience and determination.

Within the workplace, employers are encouraged to make promoting the wellbeing of their employees a core element of the company’s internal operations. Some examples of a proactive approach to stress-management might be:

  • To invite people to take active breaks away from their desks
  • Offering lunchtime yoga classes or mindfulness sessions
  • Group walks in the fresh air.

So what can help you reduce stress? Continue reading our stress, with Our Top Tips For Reducing Stress.


If you are interested in how Fleet Street Clinic can assist your workplace with stress management and resilience training, get in touch. Or if you are an individual who needs help with stress management, you can book a GP appointment online.

Top Tips For Reducing Stress

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Feeling stressed?

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. In small doses, stress can actually be quite useful; motivating us to achieve our goals. But for some, stress is chronic. Meaning it is debilitating and negatively impacts their mood, their health and wellbeing, their relationships and their work.

Experiencing a lot of stress over a long period of time can also lead to a feeling of physical, mental and emotional exhaustion, often called burnout. It is, therefore, easy to see why reducing stress across all areas of your life would be important. Stress management tips are a good place to start.

Learning how to manage your stress takes practice and time.

Here are our top 10 ways on managing and reducing stress.

 

10 TIPS TO REDUCE STRESS:


  1. Prioritise your health

    – make decisions which will benefit your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. For example, go alcohol-free a few nights each week or allow yourself time for a hobby you enjoy. These small steps for a healthier lifestyle will help in reducing stress levels.

  2. Get a good night’s sleep (regularly)

    – research clearly shows that sleep deprivation amplifies the symptoms associated with stress. Aim for between 7-9 hours of good quality sleep every night.

  3. Practice deep breathing

    – when our bodies are stressed, the muscles that help us breathe tighten. By focussing on taking several deep breaths we can quickly and effectively relieve physical symptoms associated with feeling stressed or anxious. Try to do this regularly throughout the day.

  4. Drink enough water

    – being dehydrated (however mild) causes our cortisol levels to rise, which automatically makes us feel stressed. Your body is already dehydrated if you’re feeling thirsty. So try to avoid reaching this point by hydrating yourself regularly. Aim for 2-3 litres per day, more in hot weather or when exercising.

  5. Eat a balanced diet

    – dieticians stress how certain foods have stress-relieving properties. For example, dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants, whilst avocados and oily fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids (both of which are proven to help lower anxiety levels).

  6. Exercise regularly

    – physical activity causes our brains to release mood-improving chemicals called endorphins. These help us to cope with potentially challenging situations. Both Public Health England and the World Health Organisation recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity each week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more. Choose activities you enjoy to achieve maximum benefit for the mind as well as the body.

  7. Adopt a positive mindset

    – research suggests that making a conscious effort to think positively can help protect us against a whole host of physical and mental issues, including stress.

  8. Manage your time and tasks effectively

    – by giving ourselves enough time in which to complete a given task, and by making sure that we don’t try and accomplish too many stressful things at once, we can reduce the likelihood of feeling overwhelmed. 

  9. Spend less time online

    – many studies have found a strong positive correlation between internet usage and stress levels. Spending less time on our computers and phones is a simple way to practice self-care. Having screen-free time for at least an hour before bedtime has also been shown to improve sleep.

  10. Learn to say no

    – in a culture that demands we take on more and more responsibilities, having the confidence to say “no” will only become more important. This final tip takes us back to the start, by reiterating the importance of prioritising our health above unrealistic social pressures, and brings us onto developing an essential tool – resilience.


 

Continue reading about Resilience or read What is Stress?

If you are interested in how Fleet Street Clinic can assist your workplace with stress management and resilience training, get in touch.

Or if you are an individual who needs help managing stress, you can book a GP appointment online. Our doctors will be able to talk through your thoughts, symptoms and emotions and set you on the right path to diagnosis. They will also be able to recommend relevant support services for stress, if appropriate.

Resilience: What is it and How to build it

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Mental Health Awareness Week: Resilience

WHAT IS RESILIENCE?

Resilience is the ability to recover from adversity, hardships, or significant sources of stress.

It means “bouncing back” from difficult experiences, feeling stronger and more capable to cope than before. With life becoming more stressful than ever, it is an important skill to develop which can make a big difference between surviving and thriving within work and general life.

HOW RESILIENT AM I?

Research has shown that resilience is ordinary, not extraordinary, and is not simply a trait we either have or do not have.

So here’s the good news! Resilience can be developed. It involves behaviours, thoughts and actions which can be learned and developed in anyone.

SO HOW CAN I DEVELOP RESILIENCE?

Many studies show that the primary factor in developing resilience is having caring and supportive relationships within and outside the family, including at work. Relationships fostering trust, provide role models and offer encouragement and reassurance help bolster resilience.

Several additional factors are associated with resilience, including:

  • The capacity to make realistic plans and take steps to carry them out.
  • A positive view of yourself and confidence in your strengths and abilities.
  • Skills in communication and problem-solving.
  • The capacity to manage strong feelings and impulses.

These are all factors you can develop in yourself, and which can be fostered within the work environment by employers taking an active interest in employees’ wellbeing.

TOP TIPS FOR DEVELOPING RESILIENCE

Here are a few things you could try, to develop your resilience.
Please don’t feel you need to tackle them all at once – trying one or two at a time may be enough to make a big difference!

1) Create connections

– good relationships with family, friends and colleagues are crucial. Accepting help and support from those who will listen to and care about you strengthens resilience. Assisting others in their time of need can benefit you in return.

2) Accept that change is fundamentally part of living

– accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help you deal with these more effectively whilst focussing on circumstances that you can alter.

3) Avoid seeing stressful events as insurmountable problems  

– try to look beyond the present towards how future circumstances may be a little better. Take note of any subtle ways in which you might already feel better as you deal with difficult situations – signs of good progress.

4) Take decisive action

– this can assist you in giving some control over your response to challenging situations

5) Pursue your goals

– making them small but achievable and most importantly realistic. Each day, ask yourself “What’s one thing I know I can accomplish today which will help me move in the direction I want to go? Take baby steps in the right direction!

6) Nurture a positive outlook

– developing confidence in your ability to solve problems and trusting your instincts helps build resilience.

7) Keep things in perspective

– retaining an optimistic outlook and visualising what you want, rather than worrying about what you don’t want, can all help the brain engage with this.

8) Practice mindfulness and meditation

– Mindfulness means paying more attention to the present moment – to your own thoughts and feelings, and to the world around you. Meditation involves the use of techniques such as mindfulness to train attention and awareness. Mindfulness and meditation are believed to relax and calm the brain, tackling sources of stress while improving clarity focus and even sleep. According to mentalhealth.org.uk, those practising mindfulness have shown increased activity in the area of the brain associated with positive emotions.

9) Take opportunities for self-discovery and personal growth

– by learning something about themselves, people may find that they have grown in some respect. Many people who have experienced tragedies and hardship have reported better relationships, a greater sense of strength even while feeling vulnerable, increased sense of self-worth, a more developed spirituality and heightened appreciation for life.

10) Take good care of yourself

– pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly. Taking care of yourself helps to keep your mind and body primed to deal with situations requiring resilience.


If you would like further help and support in resilience training in your workplace, get in touch with our Corporate Health department.

Mental Health Awareness Week - Stress

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Stress: Are we coping?

We all feel the effects of stress in daily life, whether it’s managing children or dealing with a problem at work. Stress is a normal response, in fact, in small doses, stress can be useful. The problems arise when  you start to have a ‘fight or flight’ stress response to situations in everyday life. This can lead to illness, both mentally and physically.

The first step is to recognise symptoms of stress:

  • Nail biting and fidgeting
  • Over-eating or loss of appetite
  • Irritability with other people
  • Substance abuse, including alcohol and smoking
  • Lack of concentration
  • Increased and suppressed anger
  • Feeling out of control
  • Excessive emotion & crying
  • Lack of interest in anything
  • Permanently tired even after sleep

By identifying stress-related problems as early as possible, action can be taken to avoid any serious stress-related illness. For Mental Health Awareness week, which runs from 14-18 May, here are some tips to help manage your own personal stress:

  • Be active 30 minutes a day can reduce the emotions and let you take the time to think more clearly
  • Take control –  you are your own worst enemy, but you are also the key to empowerment!
  • Find support –  Connect with your family and friends, the more help the better the solutions
  • Take time for yourself –  remember to have time for yourself as well. Read, relax and get things done on your to do list that may be holding you back
  • Create challenges for yourself –  Setting achievable goals, little or big can help build confidence in your abilities
  • Avoid unhealthy habits – Cut down on caffeine, smoking, and alcohol. These can enhance the feeling of stress in the long run
  • Be positive – Instead of looking at problems negatively, try to see what you can get out of it to help you grow. Be grateful!
  • Acceptance – Take ownership of mistakes, or acceptance of things you can’t control.

Our Occupational Health team at the Fleet Street Clinic are able to provide a full range of work health assessments to address the occupational health needs of your staff. Click here for more information.

To book an appointment with one of our friendly doctors, or for further details on what we can offer for our Occupational Health, call us today on  0207 353 5678  email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or book online now.

stress, statitstics, mental health awareness, may, 2018, London, Fleet Street Clinic, Whitby and Co, optics, travel clinic, GP services, podiatry, osteo, dietitian, physio, dental, occupational health, corporate, private

5 Tips To Achieve Your New Year Fitness Goal

16.04.2019 Category: Dietitian Author: Andrew Doody

So you’re back to work and the tree’s on its way back to the loft. Time to come through on all the New Year’s resolution bravado. Here are a few tips about how to do just that.

Create a plan

Decide what it is you’re wanting to achieve and tailor your program towards it. Do you want to lose weight? Get fitter? Tone up? All three? Don’t just choose the new fitness regime trend, think what you enjoy to do and go with that! You stand much more chance of continuing if you do. Identify times of day when you can exercise and which days you will do it. It’s much harder to stick to a regime that is just squeezed in when and if you have the time (not to mention inclination!)

Determine your readiness

Make sure you are mentally and physically ready to start, and more importantly ready to stick to, a regime. Check with your GP if you have any concerns about your health before you start. A good proportion of my new patients come from people who have caused injuries in the first few weeks, or even days sometimes, of starting a new regime. If you have any niggles, get them treated, and get advice on how to prevent them from recurring.

Be realistic

Set goals that are achievable and realistic. To lose a stone or be able to run 10k by Easter are realistic. To decide you are going to the gym every day before breakfast probably won’t last long. Fitness needs to be built gradually with a good base. Get advice on what exercise you need to do. Just running will help cardiovascular fitness somewhat, but needs to be part of a balanced all-around program if you want to be healthier generally. To maintain it, alone, running will also soon start to cause musculoskeletal problems.

Talk a friend into joining you

There will probably be no shortage of people thinking along the same lines as you. Teaming up hugely increases the chances of you both sticking to a program and makes it much more fun and less painful than trying alone. Even just planning together and talking about what you’re doing, (even if diaries don’t allow actually exercising together), is really encouraging.

Think long-term

Don’t look at this as a quick fix just to drop a few pounds. Take it easy and don’t rush. Tailor your plan around becoming more fit and healthy permanently. If you do it will help with so many other things, from energy levels to less aching joints or back, to stress relief and better sleep.

By Andrew Doody | Osteopath

Andrew is available for pre-exercise assessment, advice on exercise/regime planning, and diagnosis/treatment of outstanding or new issues, as well as advice on injury prevention. You can book an osteopathy appointment online

Statement on the current Mumps Outbreaks

08.04.2019 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

MUMPS OUTBREAKS IN UK UNIVERSITIES:

CASES OF MUMPS REPORTED AT A NUMBER OF UK UNIVERSITIES

Public Health England has confirmed they are urging students to get MMR vaccinations.

A number of cases of mumps have been reported in Nottingham and Exeter. The recent rise in teenagers and young adults who have not had two doses of the MMR vaccine are believed to have caused an increase in UK cases. Unprotected students are particularly vulnerable due to close living conditions. Students are being urged to ensure they have received the full two-dose MMR vaccine course to protect themselves against mumps.

A total of 241 suspected cases were reported, with 52 confirmed, across Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham and 7 confirmed cases at Exeter University.

MUMPS VIRUS


Mumps is a contagious viral infection which causes swelling of the parotid glands.

Initial symptoms can be similar to a cold and include:

  • Headache
  • High Temperature
  • Joint Pain
  • Feeling Sick
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Swelling of the face/neck

Mumps can result in some serious complications. It can cause temporary hearing loss in 1 in 20 people. Mumps can cause a rare but potential risk of encephalitis, which affects 1 in 1,000 sufferers and requires hospitalisation.

It is spread in the same way as colds and flu – through infected droplets of saliva that can be inhaled or picked up from surfaces and transferred into the mouth or nose.

A person is most contagious a few days before the symptoms develop and for a few days afterwards.

Some people suffer complications that can include inflammation of the pancreas, viral meningitis (inflammation of the brain), inflamed and swollen testicles in men and ovaries in women.

MEDICAL ADVICE FOR MUMPS


If you think you may be suffering from mumps, or are concerned about the risk of infection, please see your doctor straight away.

Those who have not had the MMR vaccine – or have only received one dose – regardless of age, should ensure they receive two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

In order to keep virus’ such as mumps from spreading, a certain proportion of the population must be immunised, this is called the ‘herd immunity’.

Herd immunity is particularly important as not everyone can get vaccinated, but those who can are able to help people those who can’t. Some people are unable to get vaccinated because they’re too ill, too young or have an impaired immune system. When we vaccinate, we protect not only ourselves but also the most vulnerable members of our communities.

VACCINATION AGAINST MUMPS


The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of the MMR vaccine, that has safely and efficiently been in use since the late 1980s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles, mumps or rubella or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles mumps and rubella are easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.

You can book an MMR vaccine online.

Links:

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week (#CCPW)

14.03.2019 Category: Cancer Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

This week is Cervical Cancer Prevention Week (#CCPW) and we’d like to remind all our patients that cervical cancer can be fatal – It is the most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.

Current UK statistics state:

> 2 women lose their lives to the disease every day

> 9 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every day

> 75% of cervical cancers can be prevented by a smear test

Thousands of lives can be saved every year with better awareness and understanding of the symptoms of cervical cancer. Regular smear tests and having the HPV vaccine can dramatically decrease your chances of developing cervical cancer and will also assist in early detection.
Smear tests are extremely important and a major contributing factor to lowering the number of cervical cancer cases seen each year. On average, cervical screening helps save the lives of approximately 4,500 women in England every year, however, 1 in 4 women still don’t attend their smear test. 

Smear_Test-Cervical_Cancer_PreventionWeek-2019

Smear tests are a method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix, (the entrance to the womb). The detection and removal of abnormal cells can prevent cervical cancer from developing. As with all cancers, the earlier a problem is detected, the better the patient’s outcome.

Information on Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer is not thought to be hereditary.
Cervical screening is not a test for cancer as screening programmes help to prevent cancer by detecting early abnormalities in the cervix, so they can be treated. If these abnormalities are left untreated they can lead to cancer of the cervix (the neck of the womb).

Symptoms:

Cervical Cancer Symptoms - Fleet Street Clinic, London, Wellwoman Clinic

For more information: www.jostrust.org.uk

Book an appointment at our Well Woman clinic today

Hayfever

19.02.2019 Category: General Health Author: Gillian Whitby

HAY FEVER: TIPS AND TEST

Are you one of the many millions in the UK suffering from hay fever at the moment? Learn more about the condition here.

WHAT CAUSES HAY FEVER?

Many allergens are in the air, where they come in contact with your eyes and nose. Airborne allergens include pollen, mould, dust and pet dander.

Other causes of allergies, such as certain foods or bee stings, do not typically affect the eyes the way airborne allergens do. Adverse reactions to certain cosmetics or drugs such as antibiotic eye drops also may cause eye allergies.

Some people actually are allergic to the preservatives in eye drops such as those used to lubricate dry eyes. There are now a wide range of preservative-free brands in unit (single) dose, novel multi-dose bottles and even sprays.

SUMMERTIME EYE ALLERGY TIPS

  1. Get an early start. See your optometrist before allergy symptoms start this year to learn how to reduce your sensitivity to allergens.
  2. Try to avoid what’s causing your eye allergies, whenever possible.
  3. Don’t rub your eyes if they itch! This will release more histamine and make your eye allergy symptoms worse.
  4. Use plenty of artificial tears to wash airborne allergens from your eyes. Ask your optometrist what they recommend.
  5. Reduce contact lens wear or switch to daily disposable lenses to reduce the build-up of allergens on your lenses.
  6. Consider purchasing an air purifier for your home, and purchase an allergen-trapping filter for your furnace.

QUIZ – HAY FEVER, EYE ALLERGIES SELF-TEST

Take this quiz to see if you might have eye allergies. Always consult your optometrist / general practitioner if you suspect you have an eye condition needing care.

  • Do your eyes often itch, particularly during spring pollen season?
  • Are you allergic to certain animals, such as cats?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with “pink eye” (conjunctivitis)?
  • Do allergies run in your family?
  • Do or have you ever used antihistamines and/or decongestants to control sneezing, coughing and congestion?
  • When pollen is in the air, are your eyes less red and itchy when you stay indoors under an air conditioner?
  • Do your eyes begin tearing when you wear certain cosmetics or lotions, or when you’re around certain strong perfumes?

If you answered “yes” to most of these questions, then you may have eye allergies.

See here for more information.

Pollen Calendar

For the best course of action or if you have any concerns about the health of your eyes, you can make an appointment online here.

In response to the current Hepatitis B vaccine shortage

13.02.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

At present, there is currently a shortage of Hepatitis B vaccine available in the United Kingdom and across the world.

Despite current global shortages, Fleet Street Clinic maintains good stock levels of the Hepatitis B vaccine.

The Hepatitis B virus is one of the most prevalent blood-borne viruses worldwide and is a major cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer. In the majority of cases, Hepatitis B is asymptomatic – without symptoms. It is easily preventable through vaccination, and we strongly believe this vaccine should be offered more widely – all young, sexually active adults ought to be protected.

Although the overall risk for travellers is low, Hepatitis B immunisation is recommended for travellers travelling to East Asia and Sub Saharan Africa where between 5 – 10 % of the adult population is estimated to have persistent Hepatitis B infection. High rates of infection are also found in the Amazon, southern parts of eastern and central Europe, the Middle East and Indian subcontinents. The risk understandable increases for long-stay travellers in high-risk areas.

Certain behaviours and activities put individuals at higher risk, such as unprotected sex, adventure sports, body piercing, tattoos and injected drug usage.

Receiving medical or dental care in high-risk countries will also increase your risk and it is advised to avoid unless absolutely necessary. Travellers who have pre-existing conditions which may make it more likely for them to need medical attention should definitely consider the Hepatitis vaccination prior to travelling.

Book your Hepatitis B vaccination appointment now

Dry January

01.01.2019 Category: Dietitian Author: Ruth Kander

Dry January grows in popularity year on year.

The campaign by Alcohol Change UK, encourages participants to give up alcohol for the entire month of January.

The dry January one-month booze-free challenge can have a significantly positive impact on your health.

Alcohol has proven to increase the risk of developing a range of health problems (including cancers of the mouth, throat and breast) and that risk increases the more you drink on a regular basis.

Ruth Kander, our dietitian, looks at what is considered a safe amount of alcohol consumption.

The UK Chief Medical Officers’ (CMOs) guideline for keeping health risks from alcohol to a low level for both men and women states that:

  • It is safest not to drink more than 14 units a week on a regular basis.
  • Regularly drinking as much as 14 units per week, it’s best to spread your drinking evenly over three or more days. 
         – If you have one or two heavy drinking episodes a week, you increase your risk of death from long-term illness and injuries.
  • Cutting down the amount you drink, a smart way to help achieve this is to have several drink-free days a week.

A useful website for more information about alcohol is www.drinkaware.co.uk

What is a unit of alcohol?

1 Unit of Alcohol as recommended by Drinkaware - Fleet Street Clinic, London

How long does alcohol stay in your body?

On average, it takes about one hour for your body to break down one unit of alcohol, however, this can vary, depending on:

  • Your weight
  • Whether you’re male or female
  • Your age
  • Your metabolism – how quickly or slowly your body turns food into energy
  • How much food you have eaten
  • The type and strength of the alcohol you have consumed
  • Whether you’re taking medication and, if so, what type
  • It can also take longer if your liver isn’t functioning normally

If I am on medicines can I drink alcohol?

People taking sedative drugs (like diazepam/valium) or antidepressants (like fluoxetine/Prozac) should avoid alcohol altogether.

There are some antibiotics; metronidazole and tinidazole which just do not mix with alcohol – drinking with these will make you sick. But for most commonly prescribed antibiotics, drinking is unlikely to cause problems so long as it is within the low-risk alcohol unit guidelines.

People taking long-term medications should be careful about drinking, as alcohol can make some drugs less effective and long-term conditions could get worse. Examples of long-term medications include drugs for epilepsy, diabetes, or drugs like warfarin to thin the blood.

(From www.drinkaware.co.uk)

What are the consequences of drinking too much alcohol?

  • Low mood/mood swings
  • Liver problems
  • Heart problems
  • Cancers (mouth, tongue, throat, oesophagus)
  • Weight gain
  • Poor sleep
  • Blood pressure instability

By Ruth Kander BSc(Hons)RD | Dietitian

If you wish to discuss ways to maintain a healthy diet and reduce your alcohol consumption, Ruth holds a virtual clinic every Friday from 9am-2pm. Please call our reception team on 020 7353 5678 if you would like to request a face-to-face appointment

Book Your Dietitian Appointment with Ruth

How to reintroduce meat and alcohol back into your diet after your January challenges

Read more

MMR Vaccine - 30th Anniversary

05.11.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

It’s the 30th anniversary of the MMR vaccine! To commemorate this scientific breakthrough, we wanted to share some information about the MMR vaccine and why it remains as important as ever for people, especially children, to be vaccinated. 

The MMR vaccine is a combined vaccination that protects against three highly infectious diseases: measles, mumps and rubella (german measles). All three of which can be very serious and have the potential to cause long-lasting and severe health complications such as significant hearing loss, lung infection (pneumonia), brain infection (encephalitis), viral meningitis and even death. 

Thankfully, the MMR vaccine is a highly safe and effective way of providing protection against measles, mumps and rubella. After 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, it is around 99% effective at protecting against measles and rubella and 97% effective at protecting against mumps. 

Some people may not remember but before the MMR vaccine rollout in 1988, measles, mumps and rubella were all relatively common illnesses in the UK, especially among children. It is only thanks to a successful NHS vaccination programme with support by the private healthcare sector that cases dropped drastically after this time. And while this is great, the target of 95% of babies being vaccinated is still not being met and there continues to be outbreaks among unvaccinated children and adults. As a result, there is a push from the medical community for even more adults, as well as children to be vaccinated in order to prevent such outbreaks. 

Didn’t have the vaccine as a child? That’s okay, there’s still time! It is really important to remember that it is never too late to catch up on childhood vaccinations. There is no upper age limit for receiving the MMR vaccine and so if you missed out on being immunised, it is strongly recommended that you have a “catch up” vaccine. This is especially important for anyone starting college or university, travelling abroad, planning a pregnancy or if you are a frontline health or care worker as your risk of exposure or serious health complications is increased.

As the 30th anniversary of the MMR vaccine is honoured, England’s top doctor and Chief Medical Officer (CMO), Prof Dame Sally Davies, has expressed her concerns that the uptake of the vaccine is “not good enough” and explains the dangers of children not receiving the vaccine. 

She suggests that the reason some people are not having their children vaccinated is the result of people listening to anti-vaccine propaganda “myths” and “social media fake news”. She stresses the importance of listening to the science that provides clear evidence that the MMR vaccine is both safe and effective, and has helped “save millions of lives”. 

Many of the false concerns over the MMR vaccine originated from a now-discredited study by former doctor, Andrew Wakefield, who incorrectly linked the MMR vaccine to autism back in 1998. This research has since been completely discredited and as a result, Andrew Wakefield was struck off the medical register for professional misconduct. Ever since, the medical community has worked hard to alleviate any lingering concerns over the safety of the MMR vaccine.

Our wonderful nurses at Fleet Street Clinic have been administering the MMR vaccine to our patients for over 25 years and we strongly believe in protecting all our patients with safe and effective vaccinations.

To read the full article, please click the link.  

You can book an MMR vaccination appointment online.

10 Vaccinations you should know about

20.09.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Some viruses thrive in the winter and are easily spread during cold weather. The lack of sunlight also means there is less Vitamin D in your body during winter, which can lower your immune system. This makes it harder for the body to fight off infections, resulting in a higher chance of sickness, even amongst the healthy.

If you’re planning on avoiding the flu this year, going on holiday, starting University, having a child or just living a healthy lifestyle in general, then there are a number of extremely important vaccines you should know about.

1. Flu Vaccine:

Now is the perfect time to have your flu jab, to ensure protection for the entire winter.  Our adult flu vaccines are already in stock including Quadrivalent, FluAd and egg-free. Due to distribution delays, needle-free Quadrivalent vaccines for kids will be arriving soon.
– Find out more about the Flu Vaccine

2. MMR – Measles, Mumps and Rubella:

Many people who are now adults have never been vaccinated against measles, mumps or rubella, either from concerns over misinformation during the 1990s or because they simply missed out on getting protected.  As a result, there has been an alarming rise in cases and outbreaks, with several deaths. Unfortunately, this year the UK also lost its ‘Measles Free’ status. Two doses are needed for protection, and it is never too late to be vaccinated!
– Find out more about the MMR Vaccine

3. Chickenpox:

There’s no need for any child to go through the misery of the chickenpox. It is entirely preventable with a vaccine that is still not yet available on the NHS, Varicella. This vaccine can be given to children over the age of one year. 2 doses are recommended for full protection.
– Find out more about the Chickenpox Vaccine

4. Shingles:

Shingles is a horrible reactivation of the chickenpox virus in adults who have had chickenpox during childhood. It consists of a painful, blistering rash. The pain can linger for months or years but it is also preventable. Shingrix is a relatively new vaccine which provides the best protection against Shingles. It offers up to 90% immunity. Supplies worldwide are limited but The Fleet Street Clinic is one of the first medical practices in the UK to make it consistently available.
– Find out more about the Shingles Vaccine, Shingrix

5. HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) Vaccine:

HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer but also causes other genital, head & neck cancers. The national programme offers all 12- and 13-year-olds in school the Gardasil HPV vaccine. HPV-4 protects against 4 types of HPV. There is no “catch-up” programme for older children and adolescents.
At Fleet Street Clinic, we offer Gardasil 9. It offers greater protection against 5 additional types of HPV. In our opinion, if you have not received the HPV vaccine yet, you are better to get the HPV- Gardasil 9 vaccine to benefit from the extra protection it offers.
– Find out more about the HPV Vaccine, Gardasil 9

6. Whooping Cough:

Childhood vaccination does not give lifelong protection, and newborns are especially vulnerable. Vaccination is recommended during pregnancy, and may also be advisable if you have a close family member who is pregnant, or if you’re likely to be in close contact with their newborn baby.
– Find out more about Whooping Cough

7. Meningitis:

We offer Meningitis ACWY and Meningitis B vaccines. This vaccine is recommended to all those who fall outside the age groups currently targeted by the NHS or have an important deadline for protection.
– Find out more about Meningitis ACWY and Meningitis B vaccines

8. Hepatitis B:

Hepatitis B is spread by blood and body fluids. In most other developed countries, it has been a standard part of the childhood vaccination schedule for many years, but in the UK it has only just been added to the schedule at birth and infancy. There is no “catch-up” programme for older children and adolescents. We strongly believe this vaccine should be offered more widely – all young, sexually active adults ought to be protected.
– Find out more about Hepatitis B

9. Pneumonia:

We strongly recommend the Prevenar pneumonia vaccine for those aged 65 and over. Pneumonia can affect people of any age, but it’s more common and can be more serious, in certain groups of people, such as the very young or the elderly. Anyone with a past history of pneumonia, asthma or lung disease should also consider this vaccine. Anyone can get a pneumococcal infection, but not everyone is offered the pneumococcal vaccine on the NHS. Prevenar pneumonia vaccine protects against 13 of the most common strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria.
– Find out more about the Pneumonia Vaccine

10. Rabies:

At the Fleet Street Clinic, we are well known for offering the full range of travel vaccines, always in stock. But if I had to pick just one vaccine I would never want to be without, it would be rabies. Protection is cheap, easy, safe and long-lasting – but expensive and hard to find if you are ever unlucky enough to be bitten abroad. I was once attacked by a dog in a remote part of Peru, and have had to look after dozens of travellers who have been in similar situations.
– Find out more about the Rabies Vaccine

Get in touch…

If you would like more information or require any of these vaccinations, please give us a call to arrange an appointment or book your appointment online today

Heat Waves – Advice from our Travel Clinic

19.06.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Exposure to high temperatures increases sweating and results in loss of fluid and electrolytes causing rapid dehydration. This can result in heat exhaustion or heatstroke which can be life threatening if not dealt with promptly.

Any traveller can be at risk of sun and heat related injuries but the highest risk is in the elderly, babies, children and those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Travellers who perform strenuous physical activity will increase the risk of illness related to the heat.

It can take the body up to 10 days to acclimatize to the heat, so it is important that travellers are prepared to prevent heat related illness.

What can travellers do?

*Seek shelter and shade during the middle of the day (11am -3pm) when temperatures are at their hottest

*If you are outside, ensure you protect your skin against the sun with a high factor sun cream

*Wear lose fitting light weight and light colour clothing

*Keep hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids and eating food with a high water content (such as fruit)

*Ensure you are taking in sufficient salt in your diet (sweating leads to electrolyte and salt depletion).

*Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can worsen heat related illness

Heat stroke can be a life-threatening emergency and medical help should be sought.

For more travel health advice, you can book a travel consultation appointment with one of our nurses.

Measles Advice from our Travel Clinic

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Measles: Don’t Get Caught Out

Cases of measles have risen rapidly in recent months in Europe, United Kingdom but most recently, Brazil. Measles is a highly contagious virus with potential for serious complications. It is a serious viral infection, spread by airborne droplets and is highly infectious. It is recommended that two doses of the measles vaccination should be given to individuals to prevent infection. Although many countries include the vaccination as part of the routine childhood immunisation schedule, international travellers should check that they are immune before departure.

Most UK citizens will have immunity in one of two ways:

Natural immunity can be assumed for those born before 1970, where individuals would have been exposed to the infection naturally.

Having received two doses of vaccination against measles. The vaccination was introduced in 1970 and is usually given in combination with rubella and mumps as the MMR vaccine.

Initial symptoms can include:

  • Runny nose
  • High Temperature
  • Spots in the mouth
  • Aches and pains
  • Sore eyes and swollen eyelids

A rash appears after 2-4 days which can present as blotchy spots, often starting at the head and progressing down.

Advice for Adults

If you are in doubt about whether you have immunity to measles, a simple blood test can be taken to determine your immunity status. If you have no immunity to measles, you can be offered the MMR vaccination.

Advice for Children

Infants normally receive the MMR vaccination at 13 months old, as part of the national schedule. However, if you are travelling to a country where there is a significant risk of infection, the vaccination can be given to infants from 6 months.

Medical Advice

If you think you may be suffering from measles, or are concerned about the risk of infection when travelling, please see your doctor straight away.

The Fleet Street Clinic stocks travel sickness medication, travel vaccines and medical travel kits. Our experienced travel clinic nurses can help advise with any queries or more information on Measles.

Fleet Street Travel Clinic

Shingrix, the premium Shingles Vaccine now in Stock

19.05.2018 Category: Clinic News Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Shringrix now in stock

We are pleased to say we have secured a limited stock of Shingrix at Fleet Street Clinic. These are the first doses to become available in the UK and have been specifically imported from other EU markets.

Globally, this vaccine is in extremely short supply and full supply is unlikely to be able to meet the demand for a number of years. This is even the case in the USA, where the vaccine was first launched since the vaccine has been recommended for routine use in over 50’s. There is unlikely to be an NHS program for the foreseeable future.

‘We believe we are the first medical practice in the UK to be able to offer our patients the new Shingrix vaccine, which provides powerful protection against a deeply unpleasant disease. As a full service medical practice with a longstanding commitment to cutting edge care, this follows an established tradition of UK vaccine “firsts” – including HPV for both sexes, Meningitis B, Zostavax, and Quadrivalent Flu.’

– Richard Dawood, Medical Director

What is Shingles?
Shingles, also called herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash caused by the chickenpox virus (varicella-zoster virus).
After you’ve recovered from chickenpox, the varicella-zoster virus lies dormant in your nerve cells and can reactivate at a later stage when your immune system is weakened. Anyone who has had chickenpox can get shingles.

Who can get Shingles?
While you can get shingles at any age, the odds start climbing at 50, then more sharply with each decade. As your immune system weakens with age, that puts you at an increased risk for shingles.

Your risk for shingles increases as you age. Previously we had recommended the Zostavax vaccination for shingles; which is still available. The difference in vaccinations being, Zostavax is only around 50% effective in preventing shingles, but Shingrix efficacy is up to 90% in preventing shingles and it’s complications. 

Shingrix Vaccination Schedule…
The primary vaccination schedule consists of two doses of 0.5 ml each: an initial dose followed by a second dose 2 months later. If flexibility in the vaccination schedule is necessary, the second dose can be administered between 2 and 6 months after the first dose.

> Due to the scarcity of the vaccine, we recommend all those having the Shringrix vaccination to prepay for the second dose in advance.

Book your appointment today

World TB Day - BCG Vaccine for Children

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Many people in the UK view tuberculosis as a Victorian disease, but in fact even today, 5000 people a year are affected by TB.

World TB day gives the opportunity to raise awareness of tuberculosis and lead to fewer cases. An easy way to help stop the spread TB is by having a BCG vaccine, which can be given to newborn babies soon after birth.

In some parts of London, the BCG is not readily available on the NHS, in which case you might consider getting the BCG vaccine privately.

BCG Vaccine for Children

At the Fleet Street Clinic in Central London, we have been providing specialist vaccination services for over 20 years.

We run a BCG clinic once a week for babies and children under the age of 6. Our baby/child BCG clinic runs on Wednesday’s.

Why have the BCG Vaccine? 

The BCG vaccine protects against tuberculosis. TB is a bacterial infection that affects the lungs in most cases but can affect other parts of the body such as the bones and kidneys. Typical of many bacterial infections, tuberculosis can be spread through long-lasting exposure to an infected person via sneezing or coughing. The BCG vaccine is a proven way to ensure protection against the tuberculosis bacteria.

You can book a BCG vaccine appointment online.

BCG Vaccine and SCID screening: What you need to know

Read more

Inbody Scanner: The fast way to measure your health

19.05.2018 Category: Dietitian Author: Anna Chapman

Our InBody scanner lets you take control of your health

Do you want to take steps to manage your weight? Are you looking to lose weight or gain muscle? If so, the first step to changing your body is to get accurate measurements of your current stats.

Here at the Fleet Street Clinic, our Inbody scanner provides you with a detailed analysis of your body’s composition. This gives you an accurate way to measure your weight g oals.

You can use the InBody scanner by booking an appointment. Our nurse will measure your height, document your age and the scanner does the rest! Accurately measuring your weight, body fat, muscle mass, BMI and basal metabolic rate, the InBody scanner tells you if you are above, below or in the normal range for your age and height. You’ll receive your results as a one-page analysis, which we will talk through with you. From this, you can set your achievable long-term health goals.

Look for more help with your health goals?

If you’re looking to get some more direction on how to achieve your health goals, our dietitian provides weight management advice to improve your health to optimal levels.

Doctors pay for HPV Vaccine to protect sons

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

HPV vaccine unavailable to boys on the NHS

The HPV vaccine is now offered to girls aged 12-18 years in the UK for free by the NHS.

Since its introduction in 2008, it has already shown to be very effective in reducing the cases of cervical cancer in females*. But the HPV virus doesn’t only cause cervical cancer, it can lead to other cancers such as anal, head, neck and throat cancers. Men are as much at risk of these cancers as women, so why are boys ineligible to receive the HPV vaccine as part of the NHS vaccination schedule?

The BBC has reported the case of Jamie Rae today, to highlight the issue. Mr Rae is campaigning for the HPV vaccine to be introduced, after undergoing radiotherapy for his throat cancer which he believes could have been prevented if an HPV vaccine had been available.

The article also reports that Professor Francis Vaz, a head and neck surgeon at University College London Hospital, paid privately to vaccinate his three sons, to protect them from certain cancers like anus, penis, mouth and throat. He said he saw on a daily basis that cancers driven by the HPV virus had been increasing in the past decade.

“I regularly see the bad end of that spectrum, so I thought the vaccination would be suitable for my sons,”

– he said.

“It’s just unfortunate it wasn’t available for them on the NHS. I was happy to pay for it because I think it’s a good vaccine.”

Why boys should receive the HPV vaccine

  • About 15% of UK girls eligible for vaccination are currently not receiving both doses, a figure which is much higher in some areas
  • Most older women in the UK have not had the HPV vaccination
  • Men may have sex with women from other countries with no vaccination programme
  • Men who have sex with men are not protected by the girls’ programme
  • The cost of treating HPV-related diseases is high – treating anogenital warts alone in the UK is estimated to cost £58m a year, while the additional cost of vaccinating boys has been estimated at about £20m a year

Source: HPV Action

Our HPV vaccine page explains how get an HPV vaccine at Fleet Street Clinic.

FLEET STREET CLINIC – SPECIALIST VACCINE CLINIC

Fleet Street Clinic is a specialist vaccination clinic offering all vaccinations from travel jabs, to childhood immunisations to flu vaccinations programmes.

TO BOOK

You can book an appointment online.

*International Journal of Women’s Health

The 8 health numbers you should know now

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

These days, we tend to be a bit more health focused with our approach to life. For those of us that think we are healthy, just how fit are we really?

A Health MOT is the best way to get a full picture of your overall wellbeing, knowing your body and its’ crucial health numbers can be instrumental in preventing illness and disease.

What numbers do we need to know?

  1. Body Mass Index (BMI) – We’ve heard this term over and over in the media but do you really know what it means? BMI is a simple index of weight-for-height that is commonly used to classify underweight, overweight and obesity in adults. It is your weight divided by the square of your height in meters.
  2. Resting heart rate – Resting Heart Rate is an indicator of your basic fitness level and a strong predictor of cardiovascular health.
  3. Waist to hip ratio – Spare body fat can often be stored around the tummy and the abdomen’s organs. Research has shown that this kind of fat has health consequences which can contribute to heart disease, obesity and diabetes.
  4. Cholesterol – Did you know that over half of all UK adults have raised cholesterol and a cholesterol test is the only way you will know if you are affected? High cholesterol can lead to heart disease, a common killer in the UK.
  5. Blood pressure – Having high blood pressure means that you are putting extra strain on your arteries and your heart. This strain can cause the arteries to clog up which can lead to a heart attack, stroke, kidney disease or dementia. All can be prevented with a quick simple test.
  6. Blood sugars – Knowing your blood sugar levels can detect if you are diabetic or importantly if you are at risk of becoming diabetic. This is very important not only to monitor and effectively manage diabetes, but if it is type 2 adult onset that is caused by lifestyle, you may be able to make dietary changes to avoid medication and actually prevent the disease.
  7. Bone density – Bone density testing is used to assess the strength of your bones. It can be used to identify if you are at risk of osteoporosis. The test, referred to as bone densitometry or bone mineral density scan (BMD), is a simple, non-invasive procedure that can be finished in just minutes.
  8. Mammogram/prostate check – Depending on your age, your GP will advise whether to have one of these checks which can help detect early signs of tumours or cancerous cells.

If you want to find out your health numbers, you can book a full body medical or GP appointment online.

World Meningitis Day

24.04.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Meningitis Now Offers Advice for World Meningitis Day, to spread the word about meningitis, how to spot it and what causes it, as well as the importance of vaccines.

The theme for World Meningitis Day 2018 is #AllMeningitisMatters.

There are several different causes of meningitis and vaccines can help protect against certain strains of bacterial and viral meningitis.

The key messages for this year are:

  • Meningitis is a potentially deadly disease that can kill within 24 hours.
  • Bacterial meningitis can be caused by many different types of bacteria.
  • There are safe and effective vaccines that protect against the most common causes of bacterial and viral meningitis.
  • Not all strains of meningitis are vaccine preventable, so being able to recognise the symptoms is crucial.

 

Statement on the current Measles Outbreaks

28.02.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Measles on the rise:

The World Health Organisation (WHO), has reported that measles cases are on the rise worldwide and in Europe alone, outbreaks have surged to a 20-year high.

The WHO states that reported measles cases (provided by each country) currently show that about 229,000 cases have already been reported, compared with 170,000 for 2017. Worryingly the 2018 number is likely to rise as the reporting deadline ends April ’19.

With a 50% increase in measles cases last year, it is important to understand the benefits of vaccinating against measles:

Dr Richard Dawood, our Medical Director explains;

“I recently heard about a patient suffering a bad attack of shingles. She didn’t believe in doctors, medicines or vaccines, I was told, and was languishing at home, with a dreadful, crusted rash across her body, and burning with pain. She had stuck to her beliefs and refused to take antiviral medication that could have aborted the attack or reduced the probability of ending up with long term nerve damage and lingering pain. Shingles can strike more than once, but since she doesn’t believe in vaccines (there is a good one that is 95% effective) she will have to take her chances of a recurrence in future. I disagree with her opinions, but her latest actions will harm nobody but herself.

But measles is different: when it comes to vaccination, personal choices and opinions have a direct impact on the health and wellbeing of others – individually as well as for entire communities. Measles vaccination is a major public health issue. Memories of the past outbreaks, epidemics, tragic disability and loss of life that drove research and ground-breaking vaccine development now belong to a previous generation. In these days of “fake news”, “influencers” and social networks, it has become too easy to undermine confidence in matters of public health. In the case of measles, concerns about vaccine safety are down to the “fake research” of Andrew Wakefield, who was struck off the medical register for concocting a spurious link with autism in the 1990s. But the damage was long-lasting.

The complications of measles are most severe in babies who are not yet old enough to be vaccinated, and children with reduced immunity. When the rate of vaccination in the general population falls below 95%, outbreaks occur and can easily spread, with the highest impact on those most vulnerable populations, undermining years of hard work around the world to bring measles under control.

That is what is happening now”.

Written by: Richard Dawood, Medical Director and specialist in travel medicine

VACCINATION AGAINST MEASLES

‘The highly contagious disease can cause severe diarrhoea, pneumonia and vision loss. It can be fatal in some cases and remains an important cause of death among young children”, according to the WHO.

The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of a safe and efficient vaccine that has been in use since the 1960s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your vaccinations including the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles is easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.

5 Facts About The HPV Vaccine

19.01.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

The HPV Vaccine, Gardasil 9, is back in stock at Fleet Street Clinic.

The vaccine is available to men and women. It protects against a range of cancers including cervical, head and neck cancer and other HPV-related diseases including genital warts.

5 facts about the HPV (Human papillomavirus) :

  1. Nearly all cases of cervical and anal cancer and 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are related to HPV.
  2. HPV is one of the most common sexually-transmitted diseases, so common in fact that most sexually active men and women will have HPV at some point in their life.
  3. There are different strains of the virus and they can be categorised into low-risk and high-risk HPV.
  4. There is no cure for HPV; some people fight off the virus without any knowledge of having been infected, whilst the virus can lie dormant in others, remaining undetected for many years.
  5. The virus can eventually cause abnormal cell growth – cervical abnormalities in women, which is why regular cervical screening is so important.

In order to protect against the virus, the HPV vaccine is strongly recommended. For more information, visit our HPV Vaccine page.

BOOKING A Vaccination APPOINTMENT

You can book an HPV appointment online.

New HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, offer more protection

Read more

Have a Healthy Start to the New Year, with Fleet Street Clinic

03.01.2018 Category: Dietitian Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

The New Year is a time for reflection, resolutions, and making a fresh start.

At Fleet Street Clinic, we want our patients to start the year in good shape, by offering a New Year “Top to Toe” special and 10% off selected health screens throughout January.

  Book Now

1. “Top to Toe” New Year special – £333*

This includes 3 treatments: a Standard Well Man/Well Woman Medical, and choose two of the following:

(* Denotes a standard 30 minute appointment)

2. January Savings

Fleet Street Clinic is offering a 10% discount on:

  • Medicals (includes comprehensive medicals and standard Well Man and Well Woman medicals)
  • Sexual Health screens

For bookings, please contact us on 0207 353 5678, email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or book an appointment online.

Each medical includes GP Consultation, full medical history and physical examination, Blood Pressure, BMI, coronary risk score, urinalysis, blood tests (including cholesterol levels, liver & kidney functions, diabetes screen). The Well Woman medical includes a cervical smear.

*Pricing is subject to change, this expired 31st January 2018.

World Asthma Day 2017

19.05.2017 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

Asthma – affecting millions around the globe

Today is World Asthma Day. Asthma is a very common respiratory condition, with 300 million people affected globally.  And the numbers of asthma sufferers is increasing each year.

At Fleet Street Clinic we deal with asthma-related complaints on a regular basis and stock medication for dealing with symptoms.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is caused by inflammation in the airways, which narrow and can become blocked with mucus, leading to breathing difficulties.

Some may grow out of asthma, whilst others will have to manage the condition for life.

Asthma sufferers may notice wheezing, coughing, breathlessness and a tight chest. Severe symptoms may leave sufferers struggling to breathe which results in an asthma attack.

Treatment can be provided with inhalers and various steps can be taken to deal with asthma triggers to lessen symptoms.

 

World Asthma Day

Managing Your Asthma

Managing your asthma is very important to maintaining your health. Keep a diary of asthma flare-ups to see if you notice any particular triggers and visit your doctor regularly for check-ups. If your symptoms worsen, make sure to seek medical help without delay.

Travel and Asthma

If you are travelling, make sure to check you have the medication necessary for your trip. Remember hayfever seasons can vary around the world. Fleet Street Clinic stock necessary medication to cover any last-minute requirements.

If you think you may have asthma, book a GP appointment today.

Swine Flu Update Across the Globe

19.05.2016 Category: Flu Jabs Author: Dr Richard Dawood

2016 Swine Flu Update

Rates of ‘swine flu’ (H1N1) infection have spiked within the EU and is spreading rapidly across eastern Europe and the Middle East. If you have any plans to travel it is advisable to be vaccinated prior to departure.

Influenza is starting to spread across the UK. Currently the impact so far this winter has been smaller than last winter, however a hospital in Leicester has stopped admitting new patients due to a number of patients contracting the H1N1 virus which is a serious strain of the virus. H1N1 tends to affect children, pregnant women and adults with long-term health conditions that place them in the “at risk” category.

Flu Vaccinations Available Now in London

The 2015 – 16 flu vaccine, available now at The Fleet Street Clinic, for the northern hemisphere protects against H1N1, H3N2 and one or two of the B virus strains, which is well matched to the strains circulating currently. The vaccine is therefore expected to provide very good protection against swine flu.

It’s not too late for people to get the vaccine, this remains important now that flu is circulating. You don’t even need to make an appointment, just pop into see us on your lunch break and we can have you vaccinated and on your way in under ten minutes.

For more information head to head to Medscape.com for all the latest info and updates.

You can book a flu vaccination appointment online.

Coeliac disease: What's the big deal?

11.05.2016 Category: Dietitian Author: Ruth Kander

What is Coeliac disease anyway?

Coeliac disease is an auto-immune condition, defined as

a disease in which the small intestine is hypersensitive to gluten, leading to difficulty in digesting food.

We’ve all heard the term “gluten free” of late, something that has become synonymous with the fad diet of the moment, but for suffers of this fairly common disease, what does being a coeliac actually mean?

Gluten is a type of protein found in many types of food. Let’s be clear, being a coeliac does not mean that you have a gluten intolerance. When you are a coeliac, your immune system responds to the gluten in your food like it is a threat and attacks it. This in-turn damages the lining of the small intestine and hinders your body’s ability to digest nutrients from food properly.

What food can gluten be found in?

Any food containing:

  • Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye

The most common food with gluten in:

  • Pasta
  • Cake
  • Breakfast cereal/bars
  • Bread
  • Bottled sauces
  • Beer

What are the symptoms of coeliac disease?

There are many varied symptoms of being a coeliac but some of the most common symptoms are:

  • Diarrhoea
  • Bloating and passing wind more regularly
  • Pains in your abdomen
  • Feeling tired all the time

How do you treat coeliac disease?

Although there is no cure for being a coeliac, you will need to follow a gluten free diet to appease the symptoms. With a little time and effort, most sufferers can follow the diet and carry on about their regular life with no further complications from the illness.

This can be tricky at first as there are so many products you would pick up from your local supermarket that contain gluten. It’s best to speak with an expert for advice on how to manage your diet. At Fleet Street Clinic we can screen for many food intolerances as well as assisting you in every step of the way should your tests coming back positive for an allergy.

If you have any concerns regarding coeliac disease or any other type of food intolerance, please book an appointment online. Or you can contact on 020 7353 5678 for more information.

Alcohol guidelines: the impact on your health

01.02.2016 Category: General Health Author: Dr Belinda Griffiths

The 2016 update on government alcohol guidelines

With the new guidelines put into place in January we’re keen to find out how people are finding the changes. Have you been able to make the small changes, or are you not bothered by any government recommendations?

Are you drinking more than you realise?

The last set of alcohol guidelines were released in 1995, although there has been updates since regarding drinking in pregnancy and young people. This is much welcomed update for world health experts and anyone concerned with how much drinking can affect their health.
The main point to take away from this recent update is that chief medical officers in the UK now say that new research has shown that even drinking a small amount can cause an increased risk of cancer. For this reason, the amount of alcohol you should consume a week has been reduced and it is now recommended that men and women have the same weekly intake of units per week.

The main updates to alcohol guidelines

  • The guides have been changed to represent how much should be drank in a week to help reduce the idea that daily drinking is healthy
  • Men and women have seen a reduction in the amount they should be drinking on a weekly basis. Both sexes should now drink no more than 14 units per week
  • If you decide to drink your entire 14 units per week, it should be evenly spread across at least three days
  • Your risk of death from long term illness, accident or injury, is increased if you ‘binge drink’ 1 or more times a week
  • It is highly recommended to have ‘non-drinking’ days throughout the week

For further detail of how alcohol can have a negative impact on your health, head to drinkaware.co.uk for more information and advice on drinking.

If you are concerned about the amount of alcohol you are drinking and would like to speak to a GP, you can book an appointment online.

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