Vaccinations for Students

26.08.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

STUDENTS URGED TO GET MENINGITIS ACWY VACCINATION

Public Health England is encouraging students and university freshers to get the Meningitis ACWY vaccination before they start college or university this autumn. Cases of meningitis have risen rapidly since 2009 due to a particularly virulent strain of the Men W & Men B bacteria.

The Men ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W, and Y.

WHAT IS MENINGITIS W?

Meningitis is a bacterial infection of the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Meningococcal meningitis (Men W) is a highly serious form of bacterial meningitis that can lead to septicaemia. It is spread by droplets that come from a person who is infected with the bacteria.

Although the strain is most likely to affect babies, statistics reveal that older children, teenagers, and adults are also at risk. In recent times, cases amongst normally healthy teenagers have spiked and the fatality percentage is higher with Meningitis W than it is with the most common strains, Meningitis B and C.

Early symptoms of Meningitis W include headaches, fever, vomiting, cold feet and hands or muscular pain. All of which could be mistaken for stress or a heavy night out, which is one of the theories as to why students are such high-risk.

Protection against this strain of Meningitis W is provided through the Meningitis ACWY vaccine. Only one dose is required.  We also carry an excellent stock of the Meningitis B vaccine and can provide both vaccinations at the same time should you require it.

Other Vaccines that are recommended for students starting University:

Fresher’s Flu:


  • Every year different flu strains circulate and infect millions of people. Being exposed to a new pool of infections in University accommodation can increase the risk of catching the flu. Having the flu jab before you go to University will help protect you against the flu and stop you getting sick.

MMR:


  • Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection which is spread in the same way as the flu. Coughing, sneezing and kissing can rapidly spread the infection, especially in the close quarters of student accommodation.
  •  Measles is a very infectious viral infection which is also spread by coughing and sneezing. There have been multiple outbreaks of Measles around the world including the UK this year, so it’s important to make sure you are protected as you socialise with new peers.

Both Mumps and Measles can be prevented by safe and effective vaccination, MMR.

BCG:


  • If you are from outside the UK, you should be vaccinated against tuberculosis (TB) before you enter the UK.  A weakened strain of tuberculosis, the BCG Vaccine, is injected to protect against the infection. Those unsure of their immunity can have a simple Mantoux test to confirm.

HPV:


  • HPV is a common virus that is passed on via genital contact. There are more than 100 HPV types which infect genital areas. Sometimes they cause no harm and the infection can go away on its own. However, the virus can persist and cause cells to change which can lead to genital warts or some forms of cancer. The HPV vaccine is offered at our clinic for girls and boys to protect against HPV.

Tetanus:


  • Tetanus is a rare condition caused by bacteria entering a wound. We recommend making sure you are up to date with your DTP vaccinations and boosters before leaving for university. This vaccine protects against tetanus as well as Diptheria and Polio. Don’t let a cut or burn ruin your freshers week.

VACCINATION AT THE FLEET STREET CLINIC

Fleet Street Clinic offers a friendly environment and a team of experienced medics to administer all vaccinations. We meet rigorous quality management standards to ensure we offer you the highest standards of clinical care: you can feel confident you are in safe hands.

Secure your peace of mind by ensuring you are protected.  Get your vaccines before university starts to receive protection in time.

Book your vaccination appointment today

Travel Advice: Measles Outbreak in Europe and the US

19.05.2019 Category: News Author: Anna Chapman

Measles Outbreak – What You Need to Know

The WHO has issued a warning about recent outbreaks of measles in Europe and the USA. Cases of measles have risen rapidly in recent months in Italy, Romania and most recently in US.

Measles is a highly contagious virus with potential for serious complications.

Initial symptoms can include:

  • Runny nose
  • High Temperature
  • Spots in the mouth
  • Aches and pains
  • Sore eyes and swollen eyelids

A rash appears after 2-4 days which can present as blotchy spots, often starting at the head and progressing down.

Medical Advice for Measles

If you think you may be suffering from measles, or are concerned about risk of infection when travelling, please see your doctor straight away.

Travelling to areas with a risk of measles

Make sure you are up-to-date with your vaccinations before you travel, including the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. If your child will be travelling, the MMR can be given from 6 months of age.  If you have not had measles or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles is easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.

Call Fleet Street Clinic for medical assistance, advice on vaccinations and travel precautions on  0207 353 5678  email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or book online now. 

Statement on the current Mumps Outbreaks

08.04.2019 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

MUMPS OUTBREAKS IN UK UNIVERSITIES:

CASES OF MUMPS REPORTED AT A NUMBER OF UK UNIVERSITIES

Public Health England has confirmed they are urging students to get MMR vaccinations.

A number of cases of mumps have been reported in Nottingham and Exeter. The recent rise in teenagers and young adults who have not had two doses of the MMR vaccine are believed to have caused an increase in UK cases. Unprotected students are particularly vulnerable due to close living conditions. Students are being urged to ensure they have received the full two-dose MMR vaccine course to protect themselves against mumps.

A total of 241 suspected cases were reported, with 52 confirmed, across Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham and 7 confirmed cases at Exeter University.

MUMPS VIRUS


Mumps is a contagious viral infection which causes swelling of the parotid glands.

Initial symptoms can be similar to a cold and include:

  • Headache
  • High Temperature
  • Joint Pain
  • Feeling Sick
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Swelling of the face/neck

Mumps can result in some serious complications. It can cause temporary hearing loss in 1 in 20 people. Mumps can cause a rare but potential risk of encephalitis, which affects 1 in 1,000 sufferers and requires hospitalisation.

It is spread in the same way as colds and flu – through infected droplets of saliva that can be inhaled or picked up from surfaces and transferred into the mouth or nose.

A person is most contagious a few days before the symptoms develop and for a few days afterwards.

Some people suffer complications that can include inflammation of the pancreas, viral meningitis (inflammation of the brain), inflamed and swollen testicles in men and ovaries in women.

MEDICAL ADVICE FOR MUMPS


If you think you may be suffering from mumps, or are concerned about the risk of infection, please see your doctor straight away.

Those who have not had the MMR vaccine – or have only received one dose – regardless of age, should ensure they receive two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

In order to keep virus’ such as mumps from spreading, a certain proportion of the population must be immunised, this is called the ‘herd immunity’.

Herd immunity is particularly important as not everyone can get vaccinated, but those who can are able to help people those who can’t. Some people are unable to get vaccinated because they’re too ill, too young or have an impaired immune system. When we vaccinate, we protect not only ourselves but also the most vulnerable members of our communities.

VACCINATION AGAINST MUMPS


The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of the MMR vaccine, that has safely and efficiently been in use since the late 1980s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles, mumps or rubella or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles mumps and rubella are easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.

You can book an MMR vaccine online.

Links:

Measles Outbreak in Liverpool and Leeds

03.02.2019 Category: News Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Cases of measles reported in the UK

A number of cases of measles have been reported in Liverpool and Leeds. Recent outbreaks in Europe, where countries such as Romania and Italy have been affected, are believed to have caused the increase in UK cases. To date, 17 cases in Leeds and 8 cases in Liverpool have been reported.

Measles virus

Measles is a highly infectious virus which can be transmitted to anyone who is not vaccinated, most commonly to young children. To prevent outbreaks, it is recommended that 95% of the population is vaccinated.

Initial symptoms can be similar to a cold and include:

  • Runny nose
  • High Temperature
  • Spots in the mouth
  • Aches and pains
  • Sore eyes and swollen eyelids

A rash appears after 2-4 days which can present as blotchy spots, often starting at the head and progressing down. MEDICAL ADVICE FOR MEASLES

If you think you may be suffering from measles, or are concerned about the risk of infection, please see your doctor straight away.

Vaccination against MEASLES

Make sure you are up-to-date with your vaccinations including the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles is easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. In 2012 there were 122,000 deaths worldwide caused by measles.  It is never too late to have the vaccine.

MMR Vaccination at Fleet Street Clinic

You can book an MMR vaccination online.

MMR Vaccine - 30th Anniversary

05.11.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

It’s the 30th anniversary of the MMR vaccine! To commemorate this scientific breakthrough, we wanted to share some information about the MMR vaccine and why it remains as important as ever for people, especially children, to be vaccinated. 

The MMR vaccine is a combined vaccination that protects against three highly infectious diseases: measles, mumps and rubella (german measles). All three of which can be very serious and have the potential to cause long-lasting and severe health complications such as significant hearing loss, lung infection (pneumonia), brain infection (encephalitis), viral meningitis and even death. 

Thankfully, the MMR vaccine is a highly safe and effective way of providing protection against measles, mumps and rubella. After 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, it is around 99% effective at protecting against measles and rubella and 97% effective at protecting against mumps. 

Some people may not remember but before the MMR vaccine rollout in 1988, measles, mumps and rubella were all relatively common illnesses in the UK, especially among children. It is only thanks to a successful NHS vaccination programme with support by the private healthcare sector that cases dropped drastically after this time. And while this is great, the target of 95% of babies being vaccinated is still not being met and there continues to be outbreaks among unvaccinated children and adults. As a result, there is a push from the medical community for even more adults, as well as children to be vaccinated in order to prevent such outbreaks. 

Didn’t have the vaccine as a child? That’s okay, there’s still time! It is really important to remember that it is never too late to catch up on childhood vaccinations. There is no upper age limit for receiving the MMR vaccine and so if you missed out on being immunised, it is strongly recommended that you have a “catch up” vaccine. This is especially important for anyone starting college or university, travelling abroad, planning a pregnancy or if you are a frontline health or care worker as your risk of exposure or serious health complications is increased.

As the 30th anniversary of the MMR vaccine is honoured, England’s top doctor and Chief Medical Officer (CMO), Prof Dame Sally Davies, has expressed her concerns that the uptake of the vaccine is “not good enough” and explains the dangers of children not receiving the vaccine. 

She suggests that the reason some people are not having their children vaccinated is the result of people listening to anti-vaccine propaganda “myths” and “social media fake news”. She stresses the importance of listening to the science that provides clear evidence that the MMR vaccine is both safe and effective, and has helped “save millions of lives”. 

Many of the false concerns over the MMR vaccine originated from a now-discredited study by former doctor, Andrew Wakefield, who incorrectly linked the MMR vaccine to autism back in 1998. This research has since been completely discredited and as a result, Andrew Wakefield was struck off the medical register for professional misconduct. Ever since, the medical community has worked hard to alleviate any lingering concerns over the safety of the MMR vaccine.

Our wonderful nurses at Fleet Street Clinic have been administering the MMR vaccine to our patients for over 25 years and we strongly believe in protecting all our patients with safe and effective vaccinations.

To read the full article, please click the link.  

You can book an MMR vaccination appointment online.

10 Vaccinations you should know about

20.09.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Some viruses thrive in the winter and are easily spread during cold weather. The lack of sunlight also means there is less Vitamin D in your body during winter, which can lower your immune system. This makes it harder for the body to fight off infections, resulting in a higher chance of sickness, even amongst the healthy.

If you’re planning on avoiding the flu this year, going on holiday, starting University, having a child or just living a healthy lifestyle in general, then there are a number of extremely important vaccines you should know about.

1. Flu Vaccine:

Now is the perfect time to have your flu jab, to ensure protection for the entire winter.  Our adult flu vaccines are already in stock including Quadrivalent, FluAd and egg-free. Due to distribution delays, needle-free Quadrivalent vaccines for kids will be arriving soon.
– Find out more about the Flu Vaccine

2. MMR – Measles, Mumps and Rubella:

Many people who are now adults have never been vaccinated against measles, mumps or rubella, either from concerns over misinformation during the 1990s or because they simply missed out on getting protected.  As a result, there has been an alarming rise in cases and outbreaks, with several deaths. Unfortunately, this year the UK also lost its ‘Measles Free’ status. Two doses are needed for protection, and it is never too late to be vaccinated!
– Find out more about the MMR Vaccine

3. Chickenpox:

There’s no need for any child to go through the misery of the chickenpox. It is entirely preventable with a vaccine that is still not yet available on the NHS, Varicella. This vaccine can be given to children over the age of one year. 2 doses are recommended for full protection.
– Find out more about the Chickenpox Vaccine

4. Shingles:

Shingles is a horrible reactivation of the chickenpox virus in adults who have had chickenpox during childhood. It consists of a painful, blistering rash. The pain can linger for months or years but it is also preventable. Shingrix is a relatively new vaccine which provides the best protection against Shingles. It offers up to 90% immunity. Supplies worldwide are limited but The Fleet Street Clinic is one of the first medical practices in the UK to make it consistently available.
– Find out more about the Shingles Vaccine, Shingrix

5. HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) Vaccine:

HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer but also causes other genital, head & neck cancers. The national programme offers all 12- and 13-year-olds in school the Gardasil HPV vaccine. HPV-4 protects against 4 types of HPV. There is no “catch-up” programme for older children and adolescents.
At Fleet Street Clinic, we offer Gardasil 9. It offers greater protection against 5 additional types of HPV. In our opinion, if you have not received the HPV vaccine yet, you are better to get the HPV- Gardasil 9 vaccine to benefit from the extra protection it offers.
– Find out more about the HPV Vaccine, Gardasil 9

6. Whooping Cough:

Childhood vaccination does not give lifelong protection, and newborns are especially vulnerable. Vaccination is recommended during pregnancy, and may also be advisable if you have a close family member who is pregnant, or if you’re likely to be in close contact with their newborn baby.
– Find out more about Whooping Cough

7. Meningitis:

We offer Meningitis ACWY and Meningitis B vaccines. This vaccine is recommended to all those who fall outside the age groups currently targeted by the NHS or have an important deadline for protection.
– Find out more about Meningitis ACWY and Meningitis B vaccines

8. Hepatitis B:

Hepatitis B is spread by blood and body fluids. In most other developed countries, it has been a standard part of the childhood vaccination schedule for many years, but in the UK it has only just been added to the schedule at birth and infancy. There is no “catch-up” programme for older children and adolescents. We strongly believe this vaccine should be offered more widely – all young, sexually active adults ought to be protected.
– Find out more about Hepatitis B

9. Pneumonia:

We strongly recommend the Prevenar pneumonia vaccine for those aged 65 and over. Pneumonia can affect people of any age, but it’s more common and can be more serious, in certain groups of people, such as the very young or the elderly. Anyone with a past history of pneumonia, asthma or lung disease should also consider this vaccine. Anyone can get a pneumococcal infection, but not everyone is offered the pneumococcal vaccine on the NHS. Prevenar pneumonia vaccine protects against 13 of the most common strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria.
– Find out more about the Pneumonia Vaccine

10. Rabies:

At the Fleet Street Clinic, we are well known for offering the full range of travel vaccines, always in stock. But if I had to pick just one vaccine I would never want to be without, it would be rabies. Protection is cheap, easy, safe and long-lasting – but expensive and hard to find if you are ever unlucky enough to be bitten abroad. I was once attacked by a dog in a remote part of Peru, and have had to look after dozens of travellers who have been in similar situations.
– Find out more about the Rabies Vaccine

Get in touch…

If you would like more information or require any of these vaccinations, please give us a call to arrange an appointment or book your appointment online today

Teenagers Urged to Have Measles Vaccination

19.08.2018 Category: News Author: Dr Richard Dawood
Public Health England (PHE) are urging teenagers and young people to ensure they are up to date with measles vaccines. A notable amount of cases have been linked to music festivals and other large public gatherings from June. Measles cases have seen an increase over the year to up to 234 between the start to the middle of the year. It is important young people either confirm they’ve been vaccinated or take steps to make sure they get vaccinated.

Measles Vaccination

Immunity against measles requires 2 doses of a measles containing vaccination. In the UK, this is part of the routine childhood schedule and they are usually given before a child starts school. Children and young people with incomplete or uncertain vaccinations should ensure they have received the full course of at least 2 vaccinations. Alternatively, a blood test can be performed to confirm immunity. Fleet Street Clinic provides both vaccinations for measles, administered by experienced doctors and nurses in a clean environment. We also offer tests to confirm immunity. We have been providing vaccination services for over two decades.
Find out more about the MMR vaccine here.

Measles Advice from our Travel Clinic

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Measles: Don’t Get Caught Out

Cases of measles have risen rapidly in recent months in Europe, United Kingdom but most recently, Brazil. Measles is a highly contagious virus with potential for serious complications. It is a serious viral infection, spread by airborne droplets and is highly infectious. It is recommended that two doses of the measles vaccination should be given to individuals to prevent infection. Although many countries include the vaccination as part of the routine childhood immunisation schedule, international travellers should check that they are immune before departure.

Most UK citizens will have immunity in one of two ways:

Natural immunity can be assumed for those born before 1970, where individuals would have been exposed to the infection naturally.

Having received two doses of vaccination against measles. The vaccination was introduced in 1970 and is usually given in combination with rubella and mumps as the MMR vaccine.

Initial symptoms can include:

  • Runny nose
  • High Temperature
  • Spots in the mouth
  • Aches and pains
  • Sore eyes and swollen eyelids

A rash appears after 2-4 days which can present as blotchy spots, often starting at the head and progressing down.

Advice for Adults

If you are in doubt about whether you have immunity to measles, a simple blood test can be taken to determine your immunity status. If you have no immunity to measles, you can be offered the MMR vaccination.

Advice for Children

Infants normally receive the MMR vaccination at 13 months old, as part of the national schedule. However, if you are travelling to a country where there is a significant risk of infection, the vaccination can be given to infants from 6 months.

Medical Advice

If you think you may be suffering from measles, or are concerned about the risk of infection when travelling, please see your doctor straight away.

The Fleet Street Clinic stocks travel sickness medication, travel vaccines and medical travel kits. Our experienced travel clinic nurses can help advise with any queries or more information on Measles.

Fleet Street Travel Clinic

4 Illnesses To Watch For in Europe

19.05.2018 Category: Travel Health Author: Anna Chapman

Health Risks of European Travel

How many of us know that European travel can pose a threat to our health?  Health risks aren’t normally associated with European travel – we think of quick flights and familiar cultures so assume we’ll be relatively safe on short-haul holidays. However, there are actually several diseases to watch out for, especially if you are not vaccinated.

Stay aware of these key diseases so that you can prepare properly to have a safe and happy holiday.

Four illnesses to be aware of when holidaying in Europe:

1. Measles

  • Measles continues to spread within and throughout Europe this year. Large outbreaks of the disease have occurred, and it is thought that the drop in vaccination coverage within populations is responsible. Countries that are currently reporting outbreaks of measles include: AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, BULGARIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, FRANCE, GERMANY, HUNGARY, ICELAND, ITALY, PORTUGAL, ROMANIA SPAIN, SWEDEN.
  • Measles is a highly contagious virus which can have life-threatening complications.
  • International travel has played a large factor in the international spread of measles.

2. Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE)

  • TBE season has begun in Europe this summer. TBE is a viral infection spread through the infected bite of a tick.
  • TBE effects areas of northern and Eastern Europe, Russia and even China.
  • Those at highest risk of the diseases are those that intend to spend time in rural forested areas during spring summer and autumn where ticks are present. Activities such as camping and hiking and cycling increase the risk.
  • Those who are travelling to areas of transmission can minimise the risk of the disease by taking strict precautions against tick bites.

3. Hepatitis A

  • Europe has seen an increase in Hepatitis A cases this year. The virus is spread through contaminated food and water.
  • The highest risk countries are those in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Balkans and Turkey, but in recent months Germany and Portugal have seen an increase in cases.

4. Rabies

  • Rabies is virus-spread through the bite of an infected mammal. The virus is almost always fatal if left untreated. Animals that can spread this disease include dogs, cats, bats, foxes and wolves.
  • Eastern Europe poses the highest risk of rabies in Europe.
  • Travellers at highest risk include those who plan on travelling to remote areas.

Vaccines can prevent travel-related illnesses

The good news is that all these diseases are vaccine preventable and can be avoided by organising vaccines before you travel.

Measles – All travellers should ensure that they have had at least 2 doses of vaccinations against measles. This is usually given as a routine vaccination in childhood (MMR vaccine) at 1 year of age, and then again as a pre-school booster

Tick-Borne Encephalitisvaccination against the disease is available for individuals aged 1 year and above. It requires 2 vaccination 2 weeks apart.

Hepatitis A – A highly effective vaccination is available against Hepatitis A and can be given to children from 1 year of age. Once the schedule of 2 Hepatitis A vaccinations has been given, immunity lasts for 25 years.

Rabies – a vaccine-preventable disease which requires three doses of vaccination to be given prior to departure. Those who have not received the vaccination with potential exposure to rabies require more extensive treatment which is not always accessible.

Travel Vaccinations at Fleet Street Clinic

Fleet Street Clinic is a leading vaccination centre and offers all travel vaccinations at our clinic in the heart of London.

Book your appointment online today.

By Anna Chapman, Travel Nurse at Fleet Street Clinic

Statement on the current Measles Outbreaks

28.02.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Measles on the rise:

The World Health Organisation (WHO), has reported that measles cases are on the rise worldwide and in Europe alone, outbreaks have surged to a 20-year high.

The WHO states that reported measles cases (provided by each country) currently show that about 229,000 cases have already been reported, compared with 170,000 for 2017. Worryingly the 2018 number is likely to rise as the reporting deadline ends April ’19.

With a 50% increase in measles cases last year, it is important to understand the benefits of vaccinating against measles:

Dr Richard Dawood, our Medical Director explains;

“I recently heard about a patient suffering a bad attack of shingles. She didn’t believe in doctors, medicines or vaccines, I was told, and was languishing at home, with a dreadful, crusted rash across her body, and burning with pain. She had stuck to her beliefs and refused to take antiviral medication that could have aborted the attack or reduced the probability of ending up with long term nerve damage and lingering pain. Shingles can strike more than once, but since she doesn’t believe in vaccines (there is a good one that is 95% effective) she will have to take her chances of a recurrence in future. I disagree with her opinions, but her latest actions will harm nobody but herself.

But measles is different: when it comes to vaccination, personal choices and opinions have a direct impact on the health and wellbeing of others – individually as well as for entire communities. Measles vaccination is a major public health issue. Memories of the past outbreaks, epidemics, tragic disability and loss of life that drove research and ground-breaking vaccine development now belong to a previous generation. In these days of “fake news”, “influencers” and social networks, it has become too easy to undermine confidence in matters of public health. In the case of measles, concerns about vaccine safety are down to the “fake research” of Andrew Wakefield, who was struck off the medical register for concocting a spurious link with autism in the 1990s. But the damage was long-lasting.

The complications of measles are most severe in babies who are not yet old enough to be vaccinated, and children with reduced immunity. When the rate of vaccination in the general population falls below 95%, outbreaks occur and can easily spread, with the highest impact on those most vulnerable populations, undermining years of hard work around the world to bring measles under control.

That is what is happening now”.

Written by: Richard Dawood, Medical Director and specialist in travel medicine

VACCINATION AGAINST MEASLES

‘The highly contagious disease can cause severe diarrhoea, pneumonia and vision loss. It can be fatal in some cases and remains an important cause of death among young children”, according to the WHO.

The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of a safe and efficient vaccine that has been in use since the 1960s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your vaccinations including the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles is easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.