HPV Vaccine Available For Boys and Girls

19.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

What is HPV?

Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is the name of a group of viruses with around 200 different types, that is most commonly passed on via genital contact.

Although HPV is highly common, 90% of HPV infections go away by themselves and do not cause any harm. Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems.

However, it is possible for HPV infections to persist and cause cellular change in your body. This can lead to:

  • Cancer of the cervix, vulva, and vagina in women
  • Precancerous lesions in men and women
  • Genital warts in men and women
  • Head and neck cancers in men and women

HPV vaccines have a well-established role in preventing cervical cancers as well as these other aforementioned conditions.

Who Should Be Vaccinated against HPV?

In theory, HPV vaccines are best given to young people before they become sexually active, and therefore before they can be exposed to HPV.

Individuals who are already sexually active might also benefit as they may not have yet acquired all of the HPV strains covered by the vaccine. Patients aged under 16 can only be vaccinated with their parents present.

Why Boys should receive the HPV Vaccine

  • About 15% of UK girls who are eligible for vaccination are currently not receiving both doses. This figure is much higher in some areas
  • Most older women in the UK have not had the HPV vaccination
  • Men may have sex with women from other countries which have no vaccination programme
  • Men who have sex with men are not protected by the girls’ programme
  • The cost of treating HPV-related diseases is high: treating anogenital warts alone in the UK is estimated to cost £58 million a year, while the additional cost of vaccinating boys has been estimated to cost about £20 million a year

Source: HPV Action 

To book an HPV vaccination for yourself or your child, you can book an appointment online. Or find out more information about HPV here.

New HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, offer more protection

Read more

Varicella, The Chickenpox Vaccine - Know The Facts

19.05.2019 Category: News Author: Anna Chapman

ESSENTIAL CHICKENPOX VACCINE FACTS: 

  • The chickenpox vaccine is not given by the NHS, but is part of the childhood vaccination schedule in other countries
  • Chickenpox is a highly contagious infection caused by the varicella zoster virus
  • In the UK, it mostly affects children
  • It can be itchy and uncomfortable, can leave scars, and can sometimes cause severe disease – adults may suffer more serious symptoms, including pneumonia
  • Chickenpox is spread by inhaling droplets coughed up by people infected with the virus
  • People with chickenpox become contagious about 2 days before the appearance of the rash, which can make it difficult to avoid infection
  • The chickenpox vaccine (varicella vaccine) can be administered from the age of twelve months onwards
  • Two doses of vaccine are needed, with a 4 week gap between doses
  • If your child is receiving the MMR vaccination or a Yellow Fever vaccine, the varicella vaccination must either be given on the same day, or 4 weeks later

HOW TO BOOK A VACCINATION APPOINTMENT

Fleet Street Clinic is dedicated to maintaining a good supply of the chickenpox vaccine.

Our private chickenpox vaccine service is undertaken by doctors and nurses with long experience of vaccinating children. Our family friendly clinic is sympathetic to parents’ needs and concerns, and we welcome any vaccine-related queries. We operate a Saturday vaccination clinic once a month, the next will be held on Saturday April 8th.

To book your chickenpox vaccination for yourself or your child, you can book online now.

Statement on the current Mumps Outbreaks

08.04.2019 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

MUMPS OUTBREAKS IN UK UNIVERSITIES:

CASES OF MUMPS REPORTED AT A NUMBER OF UK UNIVERSITIES

Public Health England has confirmed they are urging students to get MMR vaccinations.

A number of cases of mumps have been reported in Nottingham and Exeter. The recent rise in teenagers and young adults who have not had two doses of the MMR vaccine are believed to have caused an increase in UK cases. Unprotected students are particularly vulnerable due to close living conditions. Students are being urged to ensure they have received the full two-dose MMR vaccine course to protect themselves against mumps.

A total of 241 suspected cases were reported, with 52 confirmed, across Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham and 7 confirmed cases at Exeter University.

MUMPS VIRUS


Mumps is a contagious viral infection which causes swelling of the parotid glands.

Initial symptoms can be similar to a cold and include:

  • Headache
  • High Temperature
  • Joint Pain
  • Feeling Sick
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Swelling of the face/neck

Mumps can result in some serious complications. It can cause temporary hearing loss in 1 in 20 people. Mumps can cause a rare but potential risk of encephalitis, which affects 1 in 1,000 sufferers and requires hospitalisation.

It is spread in the same way as colds and flu – through infected droplets of saliva that can be inhaled or picked up from surfaces and transferred into the mouth or nose.

A person is most contagious a few days before the symptoms develop and for a few days afterwards.

Some people suffer complications that can include inflammation of the pancreas, viral meningitis (inflammation of the brain), inflamed and swollen testicles in men and ovaries in women.

MEDICAL ADVICE FOR MUMPS


If you think you may be suffering from mumps, or are concerned about the risk of infection, please see your doctor straight away.

Those who have not had the MMR vaccine – or have only received one dose – regardless of age, should ensure they receive two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

In order to keep virus’ such as mumps from spreading, a certain proportion of the population must be immunised, this is called the ‘herd immunity’.

Herd immunity is particularly important as not everyone can get vaccinated, but those who can are able to help people those who can’t. Some people are unable to get vaccinated because they’re too ill, too young or have an impaired immune system. When we vaccinate, we protect not only ourselves but also the most vulnerable members of our communities.

VACCINATION AGAINST MUMPS


The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of the MMR vaccine, that has safely and efficiently been in use since the late 1980s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles, mumps or rubella or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles mumps and rubella are easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.

You can book an MMR vaccine online.

Links:

In response to the current Hepatitis B vaccine shortage

13.02.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

At present, there is currently a shortage of Hepatitis B vaccine available in the United Kingdom and across the world.

Despite current global shortages, Fleet Street Clinic maintains good stock levels of the Hepatitis B vaccine.

The Hepatitis B virus is one of the most prevalent blood-borne viruses worldwide and is a major cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer. In the majority of cases, Hepatitis B is asymptomatic – without symptoms. It is easily preventable through vaccination, and we strongly believe this vaccine should be offered more widely – all young, sexually active adults ought to be protected.

Although the overall risk for travellers is low, Hepatitis B immunisation is recommended for travellers travelling to East Asia and Sub Saharan Africa where between 5 – 10 % of the adult population is estimated to have persistent Hepatitis B infection. High rates of infection are also found in the Amazon, southern parts of eastern and central Europe, the Middle East and Indian subcontinents. The risk understandable increases for long-stay travellers in high-risk areas.

Certain behaviours and activities put individuals at higher risk, such as unprotected sex, adventure sports, body piercing, tattoos and injected drug usage.

Receiving medical or dental care in high-risk countries will also increase your risk and it is advised to avoid unless absolutely necessary. Travellers who have pre-existing conditions which may make it more likely for them to need medical attention should definitely consider the Hepatitis vaccination prior to travelling.

Book your Hepatitis B vaccination appointment now

Statement on the current Measles Outbreaks

28.02.2018 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

Measles on the rise:

The World Health Organisation (WHO), has reported that measles cases are on the rise worldwide and in Europe alone, outbreaks have surged to a 20-year high.

The WHO states that reported measles cases (provided by each country) currently show that about 229,000 cases have already been reported, compared with 170,000 for 2017. Worryingly the 2018 number is likely to rise as the reporting deadline ends April ’19.

With a 50% increase in measles cases last year, it is important to understand the benefits of vaccinating against measles:

Dr Richard Dawood, our Medical Director explains;

“I recently heard about a patient suffering a bad attack of shingles. She didn’t believe in doctors, medicines or vaccines, I was told, and was languishing at home, with a dreadful, crusted rash across her body, and burning with pain. She had stuck to her beliefs and refused to take antiviral medication that could have aborted the attack or reduced the probability of ending up with long term nerve damage and lingering pain. Shingles can strike more than once, but since she doesn’t believe in vaccines (there is a good one that is 95% effective) she will have to take her chances of a recurrence in future. I disagree with her opinions, but her latest actions will harm nobody but herself.

But measles is different: when it comes to vaccination, personal choices and opinions have a direct impact on the health and wellbeing of others – individually as well as for entire communities. Measles vaccination is a major public health issue. Memories of the past outbreaks, epidemics, tragic disability and loss of life that drove research and ground-breaking vaccine development now belong to a previous generation. In these days of “fake news”, “influencers” and social networks, it has become too easy to undermine confidence in matters of public health. In the case of measles, concerns about vaccine safety are down to the “fake research” of Andrew Wakefield, who was struck off the medical register for concocting a spurious link with autism in the 1990s. But the damage was long-lasting.

The complications of measles are most severe in babies who are not yet old enough to be vaccinated, and children with reduced immunity. When the rate of vaccination in the general population falls below 95%, outbreaks occur and can easily spread, with the highest impact on those most vulnerable populations, undermining years of hard work around the world to bring measles under control.

That is what is happening now”.

Written by: Richard Dawood, Medical Director and specialist in travel medicine

VACCINATION AGAINST MEASLES

‘The highly contagious disease can cause severe diarrhoea, pneumonia and vision loss. It can be fatal in some cases and remains an important cause of death among young children”, according to the WHO.

The disease can be easily prevented with two doses of a safe and efficient vaccine that has been in use since the 1960s’.

Make sure you are up-to-date with your vaccinations including the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Although the NHS immunisation schedule offers the vaccine to children from 12 months of age, the MMR can be given from 6 months. If you have not had measles or if you have not had two doses of MMR, you may be at risk.  Measles is easily passed from person to person and can be a serious illness in adults as well as children. It is never too late to have the vaccine.