Mental Health First Aid Training at The Fleet Street Clinic

20.06.2019 Category: Mental Health Author: Caroline McKenzie

Approximately 1 in 4 people in the UK will experience a Mental Health problem.

Unfortunately, how we cope with mental health problems, in general, seems to be getting worse.

Leading to an increased number of self-harm and suicide victims. Spotting early warning signs in the workplace and helping those who may be experiencing workplace problems is an extremely important part in reducing the number of deaths by mental ill health each year.

Stress, anxiety and depression are the biggest cause of sickness absence in our society. At Fleet Street Clinic, we believe in creating safe, healthy workplaces where mental health and physical health of employees are valued equally. Therefore, we believe that investing in mental health first aid training, much like physical first aid training should be part of everyone’s corporate wellbeing strategy.

The Fleet Street Clinic will be running a two-day Mental Health First Aid course delivered by Leigh Mckay. This course is designed for all employees, line managers, HR professionals, OH workers and senior leaders alike who wish to become a qualified mental health first aider. By training your staff you’ll be joining a global movement of over 3 million trained Mental Health First Aiders across 25 countries.

Leigh is a quality assured MHFA instructor accredited by the Royal Society of Public Health. She has a particular interest in psychology and emotional resilience. Leigh has a wealth of experience in delivering the MHFA courses in corporate companies. Plus, she advocates that a workplace and community that promotes wellbeing can have a positive impact on everyone’s physical, mental and emotional health.

What is Mental Health First Aid?

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is an Internationally-recognised training course. It teaches people how to spot the signs and symptoms of mental ill health. MHFA won’t teach you to be a therapist, however, just like physical first aid training, it will teach you to listen, reassure and respond, even in a crisis.

A quality assured instructor will deliver the adult MHFA courses, which are for everyone aged 16 upwards. All instructors attend an Instructor Training programme accredited by the Royal Society for Public Health. Therefore, they are specifically trained to keep people safe and supported whilst they study this course.

What will I learn?

Learning will take place through a mix of group activities, presentations and discussions. Throughout the course, you will gain practical skills and awareness about mental health.

This includes:

  • A deeper understanding of mental health and the factors that can affect people’s wellbeing, including your own
  • Practical skills to spot the triggers and signs of mental health issues
  • Confidence to step in, reassure and support a person in distress
  • Enhanced interpersonal skills such as non-judgemental listening
  • Knowledge to help someone recover their health by guiding them to appropriate support

How will attending an MHFA course help?

There are many benefits to taking part in an MHFA course. Firstly, research and evaluation have shown this course raises awareness of mental health literacy. The more understanding and knowledge about mental disorders lead to better recognition, management and prevention. Secondly, this reduces the stigma attached to ill mental health, especially in the workplace. Further, this course champions its students to increase their confidence in handling mental health issues. But, most importantly, it promotes early intervention. Above all, becoming a Mental Health First Aider can enable the recovery of a sufferer and even save lives.

Course Details:

Date: Thursday 26th & Friday 27th September, 2019
Location: 29 Fleet Street, London, EC4Y 1AA
Cost: £350 per person

Spaces are limited.

To book yourself and/or a colleague on to the Mental Health First Aid course, please email to our Corporate Manager, Caroline McKenzie here.

Top Tips For Reducing Stress

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Feeling stressed?

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. In small doses, stress can actually be quite useful; motivating us to achieve our goals. But for some, stress is chronic. Meaning it is debilitating and negatively impacts their mood, their health and wellbeing, their relationships and their work.

Experiencing a lot of stress over a long period of time can also lead to a feeling of physical, mental and emotional exhaustion, often called burnout. It is, therefore, easy to see why reducing stress across all areas of your life would be important. Stress management tips are a good place to start.

Learning how to manage your stress takes practice and time.

Here are our top 10 ways on managing and reducing stress.

 

10 TIPS TO REDUCE STRESS:


  1. Prioritise your health

    – make decisions which will benefit your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. For example, go alcohol-free a few nights each week or allow yourself time for a hobby you enjoy. These small steps for a healthier lifestyle will help in reducing stress levels.

  2. Get a good night’s sleep (regularly)

    – research clearly shows that sleep deprivation amplifies the symptoms associated with stress. Aim for between 7-9 hours of good quality sleep every night.

  3. Practice deep breathing

    – when our bodies are stressed, the muscles that help us breathe tighten. By focussing on taking several deep breaths we can quickly and effectively relieve physical symptoms associated with feeling stressed or anxious. Try to do this regularly throughout the day.

  4. Drink enough water

    – being dehydrated (however mild) causes our cortisol levels to rise, which automatically makes us feel stressed. Your body is already dehydrated if you’re feeling thirsty. So try to avoid reaching this point by hydrating yourself regularly. Aim for 2-3 litres per day, more in hot weather or when exercising.

  5. Eat a balanced diet

    – dieticians stress how certain foods have stress-relieving properties. For example, dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants, whilst avocados and oily fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids (both of which are proven to help lower anxiety levels).

  6. Exercise regularly

    – physical activity causes our brains to release mood-improving chemicals called endorphins. These help us to cope with potentially challenging situations. Both Public Health England and the World Health Organisation recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity each week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more. Choose activities you enjoy to achieve maximum benefit for the mind as well as the body.

  7. Adopt a positive mindset

    – research suggests that making a conscious effort to think positively can help protect us against a whole host of physical and mental issues, including stress.

  8. Manage your time and tasks effectively

    – by giving ourselves enough time in which to complete a given task, and by making sure that we don’t try and accomplish too many stressful things at once, we can reduce the likelihood of feeling overwhelmed. 

  9. Spend less time online

    – many studies have found a strong positive correlation between internet usage and stress levels. Spending less time on our computers and phones is a simple way to practice self-care. Having screen-free time for at least an hour before bedtime has also been shown to improve sleep.

  10. Learn to say no

    – in a culture that demands we take on more and more responsibilities, having the confidence to say “no” will only become more important. This final tip takes us back to the start, by reiterating the importance of prioritising our health above unrealistic social pressures, and brings us onto developing an essential tool – resilience.


 

Continue reading about Resilience or read What is Stress?

If you are interested in how Fleet Street Clinic can assist your workplace with stress management and resilience training, get in touch.

Or if you are an individual who needs help managing stress, you can book a GP appointment online. Our doctors will be able to talk through your thoughts, symptoms and emotions and set you on the right path to diagnosis. They will also be able to recommend relevant support services for stress, if appropriate.

Resilience: What is it and How to build it

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Mental Health Awareness Week: Resilience

WHAT IS RESILIENCE?

Resilience is the ability to recover from adversity, hardships, or significant sources of stress.

It means “bouncing back” from difficult experiences, feeling stronger and more capable to cope than before. With life becoming more stressful than ever, it is an important skill to develop which can make a big difference between surviving and thriving within work and general life.

HOW RESILIENT AM I?

Research has shown that resilience is ordinary, not extraordinary, and is not simply a trait we either have or do not have.

So here’s the good news! Resilience can be developed. It involves behaviours, thoughts and actions which can be learned and developed in anyone.

SO HOW CAN I DEVELOP RESILIENCE?

Many studies show that the primary factor in developing resilience is having caring and supportive relationships within and outside the family, including at work. Relationships fostering trust, provide role models and offer encouragement and reassurance help bolster resilience.

Several additional factors are associated with resilience, including:

  • The capacity to make realistic plans and take steps to carry them out.
  • A positive view of yourself and confidence in your strengths and abilities.
  • Skills in communication and problem-solving.
  • The capacity to manage strong feelings and impulses.

These are all factors you can develop in yourself, and which can be fostered within the work environment by employers taking an active interest in employees’ wellbeing.

TOP TIPS FOR DEVELOPING RESILIENCE

Here are a few things you could try, to develop your resilience.
Please don’t feel you need to tackle them all at once – trying one or two at a time may be enough to make a big difference!

1) Create connections

– good relationships with family, friends and colleagues are crucial. Accepting help and support from those who will listen to and care about you strengthens resilience. Assisting others in their time of need can benefit you in return.

2) Accept that change is fundamentally part of living

– accepting circumstances that cannot be changed can help you deal with these more effectively whilst focussing on circumstances that you can alter.

3) Avoid seeing stressful events as insurmountable problems  

– try to look beyond the present towards how future circumstances may be a little better. Take note of any subtle ways in which you might already feel better as you deal with difficult situations – signs of good progress.

4) Take decisive action

– this can assist you in giving some control over your response to challenging situations

5) Pursue your goals

– making them small but achievable and most importantly realistic. Each day, ask yourself “What’s one thing I know I can accomplish today which will help me move in the direction I want to go? Take baby steps in the right direction!

6) Nurture a positive outlook

– developing confidence in your ability to solve problems and trusting your instincts helps build resilience.

7) Keep things in perspective

– retaining an optimistic outlook and visualising what you want, rather than worrying about what you don’t want, can all help the brain engage with this.

8) Practice mindfulness and meditation

– Mindfulness means paying more attention to the present moment – to your own thoughts and feelings, and to the world around you. Meditation involves the use of techniques such as mindfulness to train attention and awareness. Mindfulness and meditation are believed to relax and calm the brain, tackling sources of stress while improving clarity focus and even sleep. According to mentalhealth.org.uk, those practising mindfulness have shown increased activity in the area of the brain associated with positive emotions.

9) Take opportunities for self-discovery and personal growth

– by learning something about themselves, people may find that they have grown in some respect. Many people who have experienced tragedies and hardship have reported better relationships, a greater sense of strength even while feeling vulnerable, increased sense of self-worth, a more developed spirituality and heightened appreciation for life.

10) Take good care of yourself

– pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly. Taking care of yourself helps to keep your mind and body primed to deal with situations requiring resilience.


If you would like further help and support in resilience training in your workplace, get in touch with our Corporate Health department.

Mental Health Awareness Week - Stress

10.05.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Claire Braham

Stress: Are we coping?

We all feel the effects of stress in daily life, whether it’s managing children or dealing with a problem at work. Stress is a normal response, in fact, in small doses, stress can be useful. The problems arise when  you start to have a ‘fight or flight’ stress response to situations in everyday life. This can lead to illness, both mentally and physically.

The first step is to recognise symptoms of stress:

  • Nail biting and fidgeting
  • Over-eating or loss of appetite
  • Irritability with other people
  • Substance abuse, including alcohol and smoking
  • Lack of concentration
  • Increased and suppressed anger
  • Feeling out of control
  • Excessive emotion & crying
  • Lack of interest in anything
  • Permanently tired even after sleep

By identifying stress-related problems as early as possible, action can be taken to avoid any serious stress-related illness. For Mental Health Awareness week, which runs from 14-18 May, here are some tips to help manage your own personal stress:

  • Be active 30 minutes a day can reduce the emotions and let you take the time to think more clearly
  • Take control –  you are your own worst enemy, but you are also the key to empowerment!
  • Find support –  Connect with your family and friends, the more help the better the solutions
  • Take time for yourself –  remember to have time for yourself as well. Read, relax and get things done on your to do list that may be holding you back
  • Create challenges for yourself –  Setting achievable goals, little or big can help build confidence in your abilities
  • Avoid unhealthy habits – Cut down on caffeine, smoking, and alcohol. These can enhance the feeling of stress in the long run
  • Be positive – Instead of looking at problems negatively, try to see what you can get out of it to help you grow. Be grateful!
  • Acceptance – Take ownership of mistakes, or acceptance of things you can’t control.

Our Occupational Health team at the Fleet Street Clinic are able to provide a full range of work health assessments to address the occupational health needs of your staff. Click here for more information.

To book an appointment with one of our friendly doctors, or for further details on what we can offer for our Occupational Health, call us today on  0207 353 5678  email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or book online now.

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