Vaccinations for Students

26.08.2019 Category: General Health Author: Dr Richard Dawood

STUDENTS URGED TO GET MENINGITIS ACWY VACCINATION

Public Health England is encouraging students and university freshers to get the Meningitis ACWY vaccination before they start college or university this autumn. Cases of meningitis have risen rapidly since 2009 due to a particularly virulent strain of the Men W & Men B bacteria.

The Men ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W, and Y.

WHAT IS MENINGITIS W?

Meningitis is a bacterial infection of the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Meningococcal meningitis (Men W) is a highly serious form of bacterial meningitis that can lead to septicaemia. It is spread by droplets that come from a person who is infected with the bacteria.

Although the strain is most likely to affect babies, statistics reveal that older children, teenagers, and adults are also at risk. In recent times, cases amongst normally healthy teenagers have spiked and the fatality percentage is higher with Meningitis W than it is with the most common strains, Meningitis B and C.

Early symptoms of Meningitis W include headaches, fever, vomiting, cold feet and hands or muscular pain. All of which could be mistaken for stress or a heavy night out, which is one of the theories as to why students are such high-risk.

Protection against this strain of Meningitis W is provided through the Meningitis ACWY vaccine. Only one dose is required.  We also carry an excellent stock of the Meningitis B vaccine and can provide both vaccinations at the same time should you require it.

Other Vaccines that are recommended for students starting University:

Fresher’s Flu:


  • Every year different flu strains circulate and infect millions of people. Being exposed to a new pool of infections in University accommodation can increase the risk of catching the flu. Having the flu jab before you go to University will help protect you against the flu and stop you getting sick.

MMR:


  • Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection which is spread in the same way as the flu. Coughing, sneezing and kissing can rapidly spread the infection, especially in the close quarters of student accommodation.
  •  Measles is a very infectious viral infection which is also spread by coughing and sneezing. There have been multiple outbreaks of Measles around the world including the UK this year, so it’s important to make sure you are protected as you socialise with new peers.

Both Mumps and Measles can be prevented by safe and effective vaccination, MMR.

BCG:


  • If you are from outside the UK, you should be vaccinated against tuberculosis (TB) before you enter the UK.  A weakened strain of tuberculosis, the BCG Vaccine, is injected to protect against the infection. Those unsure of their immunity can have a simple Mantoux test to confirm.

HPV:


  • HPV is a common virus that is passed on via genital contact. There are more than 100 HPV types which infect genital areas. Sometimes they cause no harm and the infection can go away on its own. However, the virus can persist and cause cells to change which can lead to genital warts or some forms of cancer. The HPV vaccine is offered at our clinic for girls and boys to protect against HPV.

Tetanus:


  • Tetanus is a rare condition caused by bacteria entering a wound. We recommend making sure you are up to date with your DTP vaccinations and boosters before leaving for university. This vaccine protects against tetanus as well as Diptheria and Polio. Don’t let a cut or burn ruin your freshers week.

VACCINATION AT THE FLEET STREET CLINIC

Fleet Street Clinic offers a friendly environment and a team of experienced medics to administer all vaccinations. We meet rigorous quality management standards to ensure we offer you the highest standards of clinical care: you can feel confident you are in safe hands.

Secure your peace of mind by ensuring you are protected.  Get your vaccines before university starts to receive protection in time.

Book your vaccination appointment today

World TB Day - BCG Vaccine for Children

19.05.2018 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman

Many people in the UK view tuberculosis as a Victorian disease, but in fact even today, 5000 people a year are affected by TB.

World TB day gives the opportunity to raise awareness of tuberculosis and lead to fewer cases. An easy way to help stop the spread TB is by having a BCG vaccine, which can be given to newborn babies soon after birth.

In some parts of London, the BCG is not readily available on the NHS, in which case you might consider getting the BCG vaccine privately.

BCG Vaccine for Children

At the Fleet Street Clinic in Central London, we have been providing specialist vaccination services for over 20 years.

We run a BCG clinic once a week for babies and children under the age of 6. Our baby/child BCG clinic runs on Wednesday’s.

Why have the BCG Vaccine? 

The BCG vaccine protects against tuberculosis. TB is a bacterial infection that affects the lungs in most cases but can affect other parts of the body such as the bones and kidneys. Typical of many bacterial infections, tuberculosis can be spread through long-lasting exposure to an infected person via sneezing or coughing. The BCG vaccine is a proven way to ensure protection against the tuberculosis bacteria.

You can book a BCG vaccine appointment online.

BCG Vaccine and SCID screening: What you need to know

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