How walking can help chronic pain 

31.08.2022 Category: Osteopathy Author: Andrew Doody

How walking can help Chronic Pain 

Firstly, what is chronic pain?

Chronic or persistent pain can be explained as pain that carries on for longer than 12 weeks despite medication or treatment.

The root cause can vary person-to-person, with it sometimes due to illness or an injury. In other cases it can be due to being overweight, having years of poor posture or improper lifting of heavy weights. It can be debilitating but movement is known to help.

Exercise is a common treatment for chronic pain. Depending on your current state of health, it may help decrease inflammation, increase mobility, and decrease overall pain levels, with no additional medication required.

As an osteopath, the conversation I seem to have at least once-a-day is; how much exercise should someone who is in pain be doing?

As you can imagine every case is different, and exercise advice varies hugely from person to person and condition to condition. There is a big difference between chronic pain and recovery from injury pain. I am focusing on exercises for people with chronic pain conditions, specifically walking.

Many people with chronic pain are afraid that movement, including walking, will worsen pain. But as many have subsequently discovered, the opposite is very often true. Using your muscles and joints less can often cause pain to becomes worse. Gentle exercise like walking can really help to bring those pain levels down, as well as many other benefits like improving your circulation, strengthening your bones and of course helping to keep those extra pounds off.

Here are tips before you start: 

1. Talk to your healthcare professional first
You should always take the advice of a health professional before starting any exercise. They can ensure it is safe for you to start, and guide you with the types of exercises you should begin with. They will also help you understand your limits and outline suitable goals. As a rule of thumb, if you are in pain, stop!
I, or another osteopath, can check your posture and gait and give you tips on engaging the correct muscles.

2. Get the right shoes
A good pair of supportive trainers will prove invaluable. Walking boots that protect the ankle are only really required if you’re planning to walk on loose surfaces or heading off into the mountains. Otherwise, walking trainers will suffice. To find out more about choosing the right footwear, read our blog on How To Avoid Running Injuries.

3. Start slow
What we’re aiming for is about half an hour to an hour of physical activity five days a week, but this may take some time to achieve. There’s no rush! A good indicator that you are at the right intensity level is that even though your heart rate is up a little, you are still able to carry on a conversation while walking. When starting your walk don’t go full speed immediately. Allow your muscles and joints to warm up for the first few minutes before getting up to speed. This will help prevent damage and injuries.

4. Keep hydrated
You may need to carry a bottle of water, especially for walking in hot weather. If the weather is hot, make sure you also take sunscreen and a hat to stop sunburn.

5. Finally, try to enjoy it!
The more you enjoy it, the easier it becomes. Find somewhere nice to walk, even if that means
driving somewhere. Listen to music/ podcasts/ audiobooks, or even better get a walking buddy to join you for a chit chat along the route.

 

For more information on osteopathy services, visit the main page.

___________________________________

OSTEOPATHY AT FLEET STREET CLINIC

Andrew Doody is an osteopath at Fleet Street Clinic and is fully registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOSC).
Book an appointment with him if you have any musculoskeletal injuries by calling 0207 353 5678, email info@fleetstreetclinic.com or book an appointment online.

International Nurses' Day - Celebrating Our Team

24.01.2019 Category: Clinic News Author: Lisa-Marie Ryan

We’re celebrating International Nurses’ Day with stories from our wonderful nurses about why they became a nurse.

Each one of them has a special story to share as to why they chose to become a nurse. We are so fortunate to have them working here at the Fleet Street Clinic. We’re celebrating who they are and all the incredible work they do for their patients on a daily basis.

Anna Chapman: International Nurses Day 2019, Fleet Street Clinic, Travel Nurse

I trained as a nurse in 2013 at City University based at Bart’s Hospital, London. After working for two years in sexual health, I undertook a Diploma in Tropical Nursing at the University of Liverpool. I have always had an interest in infectious and tropical diseases, and a huge passion for travel. After volunteering in Ecuador and Kenya, I completed a masters in Nursing with my research based in Bolivia. Working overseas exposed me to the burden of tropical diseases in other areas of the world, and travel medicine seemed to be a good fit for me.

I am able to educate patients about healthy travel and how to prevent tropical diseases. I also love to travel. It is really rewarding to be able to give someone good advice about a destination when you have visited. No consultation is the same, and I love the variety of people I see. In one day I have helped people prepare for deployment in a humanitarian crisis, a couple backpacking around the world, a family moving abroad, and television crew working in remote settings.

I have gained a formal qualification in travel medicine, and have also diversified my practice to incorporate Occupational Health as part of my remit. My role is rather a niche and unique in the nursing field but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Lucy Mildren: International Nurses Day 2019, Fleet Street Clinic, Travel Nurse

I began my nursing career after returning from a life-changing gap year in Australia. After working as a health care assistant at a brain injury hospital, where the majority of my family have worked in at one point in time, I decided to pursue a career in nursing. I enjoy building relationships with the patients and meeting new people. After qualifying in 2013, I moved to Bristol where I worked in the cardiology ward and admissions department. I was also a bank nurse, which involved me working different shifts on various departments around the hospital. I gained a breadth of experience in all fields.

One of the most memorable moments as a nurse was on an incredibly stressful night shift. I was a Junior Nurse. A patient left me a plate of strawberries and a note which said ‘You’re doing amazingly. Well done- you are a great nurse’. I will never forget those kind words and the confidence boost it gave me to get through the night.

I joined Fleet Street Clinic in January 2018 and haven’t looked back since. My passion for travel and nursing work brilliantly in my role as a travel nurse. I have also had the opportunity to further my skills by completing a qualification in Travel Health.

I love working at Fleet Street Clinic, it really is the perfect job.

Jo Schryer: International Nurses Day 2019, Fleet Street Clinic, Travel Nurse

I grew up in Brighton and had a passion for science and communicating with different people, so nursing seemed the best fit for me. I moved to London to train and qualify as a registered nurse at St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington. I was appointed Staff Nurse at St Mary’s where I gained a wealth of knowledge and experience working in the ‘Casualty’ department which is now known as A+E. I later moved on to St Thomas’s Hospital where I was appointed Senior Staff Nurse and later Senior Sister on a medical ward.

I took a break from my nursing career to have my two children. Soon after I was back working in GP practices as a ‘Treatment Room’ Nurse, which is now known as a Practice Nurse. I gained many skills and loved working with the patients and forming lasting relationships and friendships.

After 42 years working for the NHS, I decided to retire and hang up my nurse’s hat. However, when I saw the job at The Fleet Street Clinic I decided that I had areas of expertise I did not want to let go. I joined in April 2018 and have been working here for just over a year. I love the buzz of working at Fleet Street. I love the team and I love meeting new patients every day.

Visit our nurses at Fleet Street Clinic. Contact us today.

BCG Vaccine Shortage in the UK

19.05.2018 Category: Clinic News Author: Anna Chapman

BCG Vaccine Shortage in the UK 

As the media has reported, the UK is in short supply of the BCG vaccine, impacted by global shortages.

The BCG vaccination gives worthwhile protection against tuberculosis, a serious infection spread by coughs and sneezes. In 2014, more than 6,500 TB cases were reported in the UK. Babies most at risk of contracting TB are those living in London and the Midlands, so if you live in these areas it is strongly recommended to have your baby inoculated.

At the Fleet Street Clinic, we have over 20 years experience as a specialist vaccination centre. We have a good supply of the BCG vaccine and run a designated BCG clinic for babies and children on Wednesday’s each week.  All our vaccines are administered by highly qualified nurses or doctors, who will be happy to answer any queries or concerns.

What is TB?

TB is a bacterial infection spread through coughs and sneezes and affects the lungs, lymph glands, bones, and nervous system.

Where is the clinic?

The Fleet Street Clinic is located in Central London. Our address is 29 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1AA.

How to Book?

You can book a BCG vaccination appointment online.