BCG & SCID screening:
What you need to know

07.02.2022 Category: General Health Author: Anna Chapman & Lucy Mildren

In September 2021, Public Health England released new rules surrounding the timing of BCG vaccination, increasing the minimum age of vaccination to 28 days. This has been implemented in line with a pilot disease screening programme that tests eligible newborns for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), the outcome of which becomes available by the time the baby is 6 weeks old. It is important that we wait for the result of this test before giving the BCG vaccine.

What is SCID screening?
All newborn babies in the UK are currently offered blood spot screening (heel prick test) that looks for 9 rare diseases, including sickle cell and cystic fibrosis. The NHS is considering introducing an additional test for Severe Immunodeficiency (SCID), a name given to a group of rare, inherited disorders that cause major abnormalities in the immune system. Affected infants have an increased risk of life-threatening infections and will normally become severely unwell in the first few months of life. Without treatment they will rarely live past their first birthday. About 14 babies a year are born in England with SCID.

The evaluation of this testing, which began on 6th September 2021, is taking place in 6 areas across England and will cover around 60% of new born babies. It is running alongside the existing blood spot screening and the intention is to roll it out nationally once the 2 year evaluation has been made. 

Why does this affect the BCG vaccination?
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is a live attenuated vaccine that can cause problems if given to an immunocompromised person. Treatment for SCID is more complicated if the child has received the BCG vaccine, so it is important that if your child has been tested. We wait for a negative result before vaccinating. 

What we need from you:
If your child was included in the SCID programme, you will need to provide a letter that confirms the negative result of screening.

If your child was born outside of the programme areas and therefore, not included in the SCID programme, we will need to see a letter confirming this. 

In either case, please bring the letter with you to your appointment, as well as your child’s vaccination book.

Nb. If your child was born before 1st September 2021, before the programme was introduced, no letter will be needed. 

 

For more information on:

BCG vaccination

Other Childhood Vaccinations

Swine Flu Update Across the Globe

19.05.2016 Category: Flu Jabs Author: Dr Richard Dawood

2016 Swine Flu Update

Rates of ‘swine flu’ (H1N1) infection have spiked within the EU and is spreading rapidly across eastern Europe and the Middle East. If you have any plans to travel it is advisable to be vaccinated prior to departure.

Influenza is starting to spread across the UK. Currently the impact so far this winter has been smaller than last winter, however a hospital in Leicester has stopped admitting new patients due to a number of patients contracting the H1N1 virus which is a serious strain of the virus. H1N1 tends to affect children, pregnant women and adults with long-term health conditions that place them in the “at risk” category.

Flu Vaccinations Available Now in London

The 2015 – 16 flu vaccine, available now at The Fleet Street Clinic, for the northern hemisphere protects against H1N1, H3N2 and one or two of the B virus strains, which is well matched to the strains circulating currently. The vaccine is therefore expected to provide very good protection against swine flu.

It’s not too late for people to get the vaccine, this remains important now that flu is circulating. You don’t even need to make an appointment, just pop into see us on your lunch break and we can have you vaccinated and on your way in under ten minutes.

For more information head to head to Medscape.com for all the latest info and updates.

You can book a flu vaccination appointment online.